It is a good thing Oscar Bisman has the qualities of a hero, as the cheeky, shy and loyal 4-year-old has a big battle against the "baddies" ahead of him.

The Pāpāmoa boy was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia less than two weeks ago and is facing a stay of at least six months at Auckland's Starship Hospital.

READ MORE:
Beverly Hills 90210 star Shannen Doherty reveals she has stage 4 cancer: 'Our life doesn't end the minute we get that diagnosis'
Woman diagnosed with skin cancer after hairdresser's pleas
Premium - Cancer frontiers: Five breakthrough areas to watch in the 2020s

Oscar's father Gavin Bisman said his parents noticed he was a "little bit off" and had inflamed tonsils about six weeks before the diagnosis.

Advertisement

The youngster was taken to the doctor and given antibiotics, but the tiredness persisted through the Christmas and New Year period.

"We noticed he was getting hot and sweaty at night but thought that it's summer. I put it down to being in the sun and at the beach all day".

When the family returned home, he was taken to the doctor again as his glands had fired up.

"They weren't just inflamed, they felt like little rocks," he said.

Glandular fever was the next possibility and doctors called for blood tests on Tuesday, January 28.

The phone rang at about 9.45pm when the kids had been tucked into bed and Gavin and Oscar's mother Sarah were watching a movie.

It was a call from the hospital who told them to immediately wake Oscar up and bring him in for further blood tests.

Oscar Bisman, 4, was diagnosed with leukaemia the day after Auckland Anniversary Weekend. Photo / Supplied
Oscar Bisman, 4, was diagnosed with leukaemia the day after Auckland Anniversary Weekend. Photo / Supplied

"We were like, 'Okay, we'll be there first thing in the morning', and they were like, 'No, no, wake him up and bring him now," he said.

Advertisement

"I asked what's going on and they said they didn't want to elaborate further. We just want to bring him in and do another test."

Sarah took Oscar to the hospital and by midnight, Oscar had been diagnosed with leukaemia.

"In 24 hours our whole world had changed."

The next morning, Gavin and their three other young children jumped in the car to head to Auckland, while Oscar was transported in an ambulance and admitted to Starship.

On Thursday, a complete diagnosis was made and a plan put together for his treatment.

"We've been pretty open and honest with him about what's going on, that there are 'baddies' in his blood and we've got to stay here until we get rid of them," he said.

Oscar Bisman (left) and his father Gavin Bisman in the ambulance on the way to Auckland's Starship Hospital. Photo / Supplied
Oscar Bisman (left) and his father Gavin Bisman in the ambulance on the way to Auckland's Starship Hospital. Photo / Supplied

On Saturday, he began the first of 10 days of intensive chemotherapy and has been responding well so far.

Gavin was astounded by the "outpouring of support" from the community, as more than $30,000 has been donated to a Givealittle page to help the family.

"I've got hundreds of messages on Facebook, even from people we don't even know. I feel bad I haven't had the chance to reply to them all."

Mt Maunganui showjumper takes on ultramarathon for Oscar

Mount Maunganui's Lucy Olphert is one of those people to step up and help Oscar win the fight.

Mount Maunganui's Lucy Olphert spontaneously signed up to run the 51 km race in the Tarawera Ultramarathon to help Oscar fight the
Mount Maunganui's Lucy Olphert spontaneously signed up to run the 51 km race in the Tarawera Ultramarathon to help Oscar fight the "baddies". Photo / Supplied

The 31-year-old professional showjumper has never met Oscar or his family but has seen others battle the disease.

She was catching up with friends on Sunday when she got the idea to spontaneously enter the 51km race in the Tarawera Ultramarathon this Saturday.

"I was feeling like my challenge bucket was empty and I thought, 'That looks fun,'" she said.

She found out about Oscar's battle the next day and knew on the spot that was the cause she was going to run for.

"Let's be honest, 51km is a long way . . . I'm not a passionate runner so I need a worthy cause to get me through."

Mount Maunganui's Lucy Olphert spontaneously signed up to run the 51 km race in the Tarawera Ultramarathon to help Oscar fight the
Mount Maunganui's Lucy Olphert spontaneously signed up to run the 51 km race in the Tarawera Ultramarathon to help Oscar fight the "baddies". Photo / Supplied

She completed the Rotorua Marathon in 2016 after a last-minute entry, but this is the first time she has committed to running an ultramarathon.

The only running she has recently done was an 8km jog down Mount Maunganui beach on Tuesday.

"It feels like you're cramming for a test and you know you're screwed ... but I think you might as well save yourself for the actual race," she said.

"I think it will be the adrenalin that will get me through."

She posted on a community Facebook page to call for sponsors and cover the $300 entry fee. Within an hour, she had multiple businesses putting up their hand to help.

"From what I understand, Gavin and his family are always he first to jump in, help out and be selfless, so I just want to do something to give back and help."