"I came because Granny doesn't have any boobs."

Out of the mouths of babes - namely nine-year-old Ella Holtom - at the Hot Pink Walk and Pooch Parade for Breast Cancer through the Tauranga CBD this evening.

Ella was among a large and lively crowd who came decked out in outrageous pink for the annual 2km memorial walk and fundraiser for the Breast Cancer Support Service.

She arrived in a long, bright pink tutu to support her grandmothers, who both suffered from breast cancer.

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Tauranga resident Moira Vincent said she had attended the event for the last five years.

"It gets bigger and brighter every year."

Vincent had her "own journey" with breast cancer after she had been diagnosed in 2014.

She now came every year. This year her sister and workmates joined her to support the cause.

 Jumping for joy are Lois Atkins, Caroline Gill, Donna Jones, Mica Dawson and Stephanie Alcock. Photo / George Novak
Jumping for joy are Lois Atkins, Caroline Gill, Donna Jones, Mica Dawson and Stephanie Alcock. Photo / George Novak

Lindsey Morgan and Leone Turner came to help fundraise by walking around with donation buckets.

The duo had done the same for the prostate awareness event.

"You can't do one without the other," Turner said.

Her mother had braved breast cancer and she believed it was more common than people might think.

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Morgan said her first exposure to breast cancer was when she discovered her flatmate had it, diagnosed at age 21.

When the two women were living together, Morgan was called to the bathroom by her flatmate to deal with a bug.

Morgan came in and was shocked to see a wig on the floor and her flatmate with a hairless head.

Leone Turner and Lindsey Morgan rattle the donation bucket. Photo / George Novak
Leone Turner and Lindsey Morgan rattle the donation bucket. Photo / George Novak

"My flatmate said, 'look the bug is there'. I said, yes I can see the bug but where's your hair!" Morgan said.

Her flatmate had a double mastectomy when she was 28.

Morgan said she fundraised to support those who were affected.

"We chase men on bikes down the street and into pubs to get money from them. Even if they don't have any money, that awareness is still raised."

"The strength in this community is highlighted by their compassion even if they are unwell themselves."

The event - first run in 1992 - was organised by the Breast Cancer Support Service Tauranga Trust and House of Travel.