By The Advertiser, News Corp Australia Network

Startling new evidence has virtually pinpointed the location of MH370 - 1258 days since it disappeared.

PerthNow reports the Australian Transport Safety Bureau has just released an explosive new report that combines a refinement of drift modelling from debris washed up in the Western Indian Ocean and previously discarded satellite images of apparent debris in the ocean.

Debris found on the island of Reunion east of Madagascar, appears to be part of Malaysia Airlines MH370 that disappeared in 2014. Photo / Getty Images
Debris found on the island of Reunion east of Madagascar, appears to be part of Malaysia Airlines MH370 that disappeared in 2014. Photo / Getty Images

That drift modelling initially released late last year identified a new area of 25,000sq km just outside the original search area.

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The images taken by a French Military satellite which showed apparent debris were discarded by governments and authorities in late March 2014 - before the ATSB became involved in the search.

However, with the CSIRO's groundbreaking reverse drift modelling now refined down to an area of 5000sq km, pinpointing the most likely location of MH370, all satellite imagery of the relevant new area has come up for review.

GeoScience Australia has been examining four satellite images taken in the weeks after the loss of MH370 in the area identified late last year as where the plane is and have found 12 objects that are deemed man made and 28 that possibly man-made.

The dimensions of these objects are comparable with some of the debris items that have washed up on African beaches and their location near the 7th arc makes them impossible to ignore says the reports.

No5 Squadron checks instruments on the RNZAF P-3K2 Orion after media was briefed about RNZAF missions looking for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean. Photo / Greg Bowker
No5 Squadron checks instruments on the RNZAF P-3K2 Orion after media was briefed about RNZAF missions looking for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean. Photo / Greg Bowker

After nearly three years, the hunt for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 ended in futility and frustration, as crews completed their deep-sea search of a desolate stretch of the Indian Ocean without finding a trace of the plane.

The Joint Agency Coordination Centre in Australia, which has helped lead the $160 million hunt for the Boeing 777 in remote waters west of Australia, said the search had officially been suspended after crews finished their fruitless sweep of the 120,000-square kilometre search zone.

"Despite every effort using the best science available, cutting-edge technology, as well as modelling and advice from highly skilled professionals who are the best in their field, unfortunately, the search has not been able to locate the aircraft," the agency said in a statement, which was a joint communique between the transport ministers of Malaysia, Australia and China.

No5 Squadron checks instruments on the RNZAF P-3K2 Orion after media was briefed about RNZAF missions looking for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean. Photo / Greg Bowker
No5 Squadron checks instruments on the RNZAF P-3K2 Orion after media was briefed about RNZAF missions looking for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean. Photo / Greg Bowker

"Accordingly, the underwater search for MH370 has been suspended. The decision to suspend the underwater search has not been taken lightly nor without sadness."

Officials investigating the plane's disappearance have recommended search crews head north to a new area identified in a recent analysis as a possible crash site.

But the Australian government nixed the idea.

This story was originally published by The Advertiser.