Donald Trump declares election irrelevant: 'What are we even having it for, just give it to Trump'

By s News Corp Australia Network, Staff writers, agencie

US presidential hopeful Donald Trump is convinced he deserves the top job: "We should just cancel the election and just give it to Trump ... What are we even having it for?"

Trump says he is so clearly the superior candidate that he should be crowned the winner without a contest - even though polls show him behind.

Trump joked that he's been thinking: "We should just cancel the election and just give it to Trump, right? Her policies are so bad!"

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump kisses a sign during a campaign rally. Photo / AP
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump kisses a sign during a campaign rally. Photo / AP

The Republican nominee had been talking this morning about rival Hillary Clinton's tax policies and making the case to a Toledo, Ohio audience that his undefined proposals are much better.

He's also joking about the how successful of one of his new catchphrases "Drain the swamp!" has become at his rallies. Trump compared himself to singer Frank Sinatra embracing a song he wasn't a huge fan of at first. Trump says he thought the saying was "terrible," but "now it's become one of the hottest phrases anywhere in the world" and he likes it.

But, jokes aside, Trump has continued his attack on Clinton as being a creature of a corrupt political system. Trump seized on newly public emails in which longtime Bill Clinton aide Doug Band describes overlapping relationships of the Clintons' global philanthropy and the family's private enrichment.

The emails were among thousands stolen from the private account of a top Clinton aide, part of a hacking the Democratic campaign has blamed on the Russians.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Photo / AP
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Photo / AP

"Mr. Band called the arrangement 'unorthodox.' The rest of us call it outright corrupt," Trump declared during a rally in Ohio.

Clinton made no mention of the emails as she campaigned alongside Mrs. Obama, their first joint appearance of the campaign. The first lady has emerged as one of Clinton's most powerful surrogates, passionately touting her experience and denouncing Trump as too divisive and thin-skinned for the White House.

Mrs Obama accused Trump's campaign of trying to depress voter turnout and panned his provocative assertion that the results of the November 8 contest may be rigged.

"Just for the record, in this country, the United States of America, the voters decide elections," the first lady said. "They've always decided."

- news.com.au

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