Baby kangaroo survives Australian bushfire

The Waroona Veterinary Clinic has shared images of the injured animals on their Facebook page. Photo / Facebook
The Waroona Veterinary Clinic has shared images of the injured animals on their Facebook page. Photo / Facebook

An image of an injured joey with heavily bandaged hands, feet and tail shows the devastation the Western Australia bush fires have had on wildlife.

The heartbreaking image was uploaded to Waroona Veterinary Clinic's Facebook page.

A kangaroo joey admitted to Waroona Veterinary Clinic after suffering extensive burns in devastating bushfires which rocked Western Australia this month. Photo / Waroona Veterinary Clinic Facebook
A kangaroo joey admitted to Waroona Veterinary Clinic after suffering extensive burns in devastating bushfires which rocked Western Australia this month. Photo / Waroona Veterinary Clinic Facebook

According to the Daily Mail the clinic in Yarlopp is providing round-the-clock care for animals wounded in the blaze which tore through the town in early January.

The clinic revealed the joey had survived extensive burns to much of his body.

Members of the community have donated to help the vets who are working free of charge. Photo / Waroona Veterinary Clinic Facebook
Members of the community have donated to help the vets who are working free of charge. Photo / Waroona Veterinary Clinic Facebook

Unfortunately not all animals have been so lucky and despite their best efforts vets couldn't save an alpaca found at a property ravaged by the blaze.

The fires destroyed 143 properties in the area south of Perth and also took a toll on the wildlife in the region.

Doctor Rebecca Flegg, one of the vets to travel to the region, told the ABC about the range of wildlife left fighting for their life.

Vets have been working around-the-clock to help the injured animals. Photo / Waroona Veterinary Clinic Facebook
Vets have been working around-the-clock to help the injured animals. Photo / Waroona Veterinary Clinic Facebook

"We have joeys with badly burned feet, tails and paws, possums with burned tails and noses and birds that have either been hit by cars or dehydrated.

"The animals have no idea what's going on, they've lost their homes in this too."

The clinic has worked non-stop since the fires broke out, taking in animals free of charge.

People were forced to flee their homes leaving pets behind. Photo / Waroona Veterinary Clinic Facebook
People were forced to flee their homes leaving pets behind. Photo / Waroona Veterinary Clinic Facebook

The local community has chipped in with donations of medical supplies.

Yarloop residents barely had time to save themselves, let alone their animals.

Dr Flegg said some had no choice but to leave their pets behind.

Two female joey's were seen to become life long friend after quickly bonding. Photo / Waroona Veterinary Clinic Facebook
Two female joey's were seen to become life long friend after quickly bonding. Photo / Waroona Veterinary Clinic Facebook

As residents returned they found some had suffered smoke inhalation, burns, or had passed away.

Dr Flegg said the task of caring for the animals has been exhausting and emotional but the community has badned together.

- nzherald.co.nz

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