Hamish Fletcher

Hamish Fletcher is a business reporter for the NZ Herald

Dotcom tweets his way to folk hero status

Kim Dotcom (r) pictured with Ben Gracewood during the pool party at the Dotcom mansion organised through twitter this week. Photo / supplied
Kim Dotcom (r) pictured with Ben Gracewood during the pool party at the Dotcom mansion organised through twitter this week. Photo / supplied

Will the public take to the streets and march in support of internet mogul Kim Dotcom?

After inviting Auckland software developer Ben Gracewood and two others for a swim at his mansion on Sunday, the Megaupload founder is keen to organise more Dotcom events - including a march.

Since the weekend Dotcom has hinted Sunday's get-together, dubbed as #swimatkims on Twitter, would be repeated on a bigger scale.

"#swimatkims will return for everybody. Need a big public pool. Awesome DJ. Sound & lights. Who's in?..." Dotcom tweeted.

But last night the Coatesville resident suggested he is eyeing up more than just a pool party and may organise people to join him in court as he fights extradition to the United States.

"So how about a site & 4 teams to organize #swimatkims, #march4kim, #joinkimincourt and #kim4starship (kids hospital fundraiser)? Who's in?" Dotcom tweeted yesterday evening.

He received numerous replies on the micro-blogging site from users saying they were interested in getting involved.

Dotcom joined Twitter last week and in less than 7 days he has amassed almost 40,000 followers - only 11,000 fewer than Prime Minister John Key.

Dotcom has proved a prolific user, posting intimate photos that give a never-before-seen insight into his family and personal life. Other photos poke fun at the charges he and his three Megaupload associates are facing.

Dotcom was arrested with three Megaupload colleagues in January after a request for help from the United States. The FBI accused Dotcom and others working at the company of the world's biggest case of criminal copyright violation.

The four charged here - and one other in the Netherlands - face trial in the US over allegations they oversaw a "Mega-conspiracy" of copyright violation. The raids brought down the Megaupload websites, which had previously carried about 4 per cent of the world's internet traffic.

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