'All of his organs failed but his heart wouldn't stop beating for 30 minutes'

FILE - In this Feb. 25, 1964, file photo, Muhammad Ali, or Cassius Clay at the time, strikes a familiar pose as he shouts 'I am the greatest' as he leaves the ring. Photo / AP.
FILE - In this Feb. 25, 1964, file photo, Muhammad Ali, or Cassius Clay at the time, strikes a familiar pose as he shouts 'I am the greatest' as he leaves the ring. Photo / AP.

The daughter of fallen icon Muhammad Ali has taken to social media to share how he was a fighter up until the very end.

The boxing legend died on Friday at age 74 in a Phoenix-area hospital due to respiratory complications after a 32-year battle with Parkinson's disease. He was surrounded by his loved ones, including daughter Hana Ali.

During a press conference on Saturday afternoon, the family's spokesman, Bob Gunnell, said it was a 'very solemn' time when the boxer's family came together to say their final goodbyes.

Gunnell said the family is planning to hold private funeral on Thursday (Fri NZ time) for the icon and that a public funeral will be held on Friday in Louisville, Kentucky.

Former President Bill Clinton and Billy Crystal will be giving eulogies, as the champion had previously requested.

Gunnel also revealed that the three-time world heavyweight champion fighter did not suffer at the time of his death.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer also announced that the city will hold a memorial for the boxing legend on Saturday morning.

Since the time of his death, Hana Ali has shared a few touching tributes to her father that provide an inside look as to how he was as a family man.

On Saturday, she took to Twitter and wrote how happy her family is that her father is 'free,' but shared how he fought until the very end and thanked people for their support.


'Our hearts are literally hurting. But We are so happy daddy is free now. We all tried to stay strong and whispered in his ear, 'You can go now. We will be okay. We love. Thank you. You can go back to God now.'

'All of us were around him hugging and kissing him and holding his hands, chanting the Islamic prayer

'All of his organs failed but his HEART wouldn't stop beating. For 30 minutes...his heart just keep (sic) beating.

'No one had ever seen anything like it. A true testament to the strength of his Spirit and Will!

'Thank you for all for your love and support!!!'

Hana Ali, who is the author of his autobiography The Soul of a Butterfly and More Than A hero, life lessons from Ali, also shared several photos of her father to Instagram.


In one sweet snap, she is pictured smiling next to him as he holds a chocolate bar and gazes warmly into the camera.

'Our father was a 'Humble Mountain!' And now he has gone home to God,' she captioned the photo.

'Pray for the peace of his beautiful soul and for the happiness of his further journey.
'God bless you daddy. YOU ARE THE LOVE OF MY LIFE!'

In another picture she shared to Instagram, it shows him giving her a gentle kiss when she was a child.

A photo posted by Hana Ali (@hanayali) on


Hana Ali also shared a black and white photo of the champion with his arm raised as he's being interviewed after what appears to be a fight.

Many of the photos on her Instagram page show the boxer in intimate moments with his family and provide context to his relationship with her and other family members.

The legend's other daughter, Rasheda Ali, also took to social media and said that her father is 'the Greatest Man that ever lived.'

'Daddy my best friend & my Hero,' she tweeted. 'You R no longer suffering & now in a better place.'

The three-time heavy weight champion of the world is survived by his fourth wife, Lonnie, and his nine children, including seven girls and two boys and a brother named Rahaman Ali.

Also on Saturday, President Barack Obama released a powerful tribute to his hero and thanked him for 'gracing our time.'

In a joint statement, the US leader and the First Lady remembered the fallen icon as a man who 'helped us get used to the America we recognize today'.

Ali became such an inspiration to Obama that a photo of the boxer standing triumphantly over a floored Sonny Liston hung in his office when he was campaigning to become Illinois senator in 2004.

The president's former Chief Strategist David Axelrod shared a poignant image of the as yet unknown politician hard at work underneath the image of his hero.

Obama wrote Saturday: 'Muhammad Ali was The Greatest. Period. If you just asked him, he'd tell you.

'But what made The Champ the greatest - what truly separated him from everyone else - is that everyone else would tell you pretty much the same thing.

'Like everyone else on the planet, Michelle and I mourn his passing. But we're also grateful to God for how fortunate we are to have known him... for how fortunate we all are that The Greatest chose to grace our time.'

PRESIDENT OBAMA'S TRIBUTE TO MUHAMMAD ALI IN FULL

Muhammad Ali was The Greatest. Period. If you just asked him, he'd tell you. He'd tell you he was the double greatest; that he'd 'handcuffed lightning, thrown thunder into jail.'

But what made The Champ the greatest - what truly separated him from everyone else - is that everyone else would tell you pretty much the same thing.

Like everyone else on the planet, Michelle and I mourn his passing. But we're also grateful to God for how fortunate we are to have known him, if just for a while; for how fortunate we all are that The Greatest chose to grace our time.

In my private study, just off the Oval Office, I keep a pair of his gloves on display, just under that iconic photograph of him - the young champ, just 22 years old, roaring like a lion over a fallen Sonny Liston. I was too young when it was taken to understand who he was - still Cassius Clay, already an Olympic Gold Medal winner, yet to set out on a spiritual journey that would lead him to his Muslim faith, exile him at the peak of his power, and set the stage for his return to greatness with a name as familiar to the downtrodden in the slums of Southeast Asia and the villages of Africa as it was to cheering crowds in Madison Square Garden.

'I am America,' he once declared. 'I am the part you won't recognize. But get used to me - black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own. Get used to me.'

That's the Ali I came to know as I came of age - not just as skilled a poet on the mic as he was a fighter in the ring, but a man who fought for what was right. A man who fought for us. He stood with King and Mandela; stood up when it was hard; spoke out when others wouldn't. His fight outside the ring would cost him his title and his public standing. It would earn him enemies on the left and the right, make him reviled, and nearly send him to jail. But Ali stood his ground. And his victory helped us get used to the America we recognize today.

He wasn't perfect, of course. For all his magic in the ring, he could be careless with his words, and full of contradictions as his faith evolved. But his wonderful, infectious, even innocent spirit ultimately won him more fans than foes - maybe because in him, we hoped to see something of ourselves. Later, as his physical powers ebbed, he became an even more powerful force for peace and reconciliation around the world. We saw a man who said he was so mean he'd make medicine sick reveal a soft spot, visiting children with illness and disability around the world, telling them they, too, could become the greatest. We watched a hero light a torch, and fight his greatest fight of all on the world stage once again; a battle against the disease that ravaged his body, but couldn't take the spark from his eyes.

Muhammad Ali shook up the world. And the world is better for it. We are all better for it. Michelle and I send our deepest condolences to his family, and we pray that the greatest fighter of them all finally rests in peace.

-Daily Mail

- Daily Mail

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