A double-decker bus made the journey to Castlecliff on Saturday to celebrate a newly decorated bus shelter and the first birthday of Castlecliff's Rangiora St library.

The bus, provided by Whanganui's Neville Gorrie, left from outside the Taupō Quay Tramshed, with Whanganui performer and transport enthusiast Anthonie Tonnon acting as conductor.

"The bus travelled along the old tram and Greyhound bus routes to get out to Castlecliff," Tonnon said.

"We do arts really well in Whanganui, and we have good turn outs to arts events, so it makes sense that if we combine art with public transport it'll go well.

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Bus conductor Anthonie Tonnon with an old Greyhound bus sign for Castlecliff. Photo / Bevan Conley
Bus conductor Anthonie Tonnon with an old Greyhound bus sign for Castlecliff. Photo / Bevan Conley

"We had even more people on the bus at the Castlecliff end, and it was great to see.

"The shelter was paid for by Horizons District Council and it looks fantastic, Claire [Bell] did an amazing job with that."

Tonnon said mayor Hamish McDouall was on board, along with Whanganui district councillors, and Whanganui kaumātua John Maihi was also present to give a karakia.

The double-decker bus on its way to Castlecliff on Saturday. Photo / Bevan Conley
The double-decker bus on its way to Castlecliff on Saturday. Photo / Bevan Conley

Claire Bell, the artist behind the bus shelter's engraved glass, said she was thrilled by how many people came out to the event.

"We had about 150 people turn up, and the bus was full," she said.

"There was a lot of community support, which was just wonderful, and there was no wind or rain."

Bell said her engraved glass was on the bus shelter to negate vandalism, and that often people didn't value the glass shelters and damaged them.

"This time it's incorporated with artwork that fits in with the rest of Rangiora St, with a theme to match the dunes and Whanganui's close ties with the arts and crafts movement.

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"I was really, really happy with the day."