Amy Baldacchino will be the youngest competitor when she takes to the gym in the Downer New Zealand Masters Games in Whanganui.

At 20 years old, the gymnast is a decade younger than the event itself, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary when it gets under way on February 1.

Baldacchino was convinced to register for the games by her coaches in Gisborne, who competed in the Masters Games a few years ago and knew about the age requirements.

Amy Baldacchino was named the top tumbler aged 17 and over at the Gisborne Trampoline Club prize-giving. She will be the youngest competitor at the Masters Games in Whanganui. Photo / Supplied
Amy Baldacchino was named the top tumbler aged 17 and over at the Gisborne Trampoline Club prize-giving. She will be the youngest competitor at the Masters Games in Whanganui. Photo / Supplied

"Gymnastics is a sport that you do when you're younger, not many people in it are old, so in masters gymnastics you can enter from when you're 20," Baldacchino said.

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"I'm hoping there are some other competitors around my age, I'd like to make some new friends, but from what they've told me, it's more around the 30-plus age."

The lowest age a competitor can be at the Masters Games is defined by each sport that can be competed in.

People as young as 18 could take part in ice figure skating for example, but they could not compete in a sport like netball where the minimum age requirement is 30.

Baldacchino was keen to get involved due to her love of gymnastics, which she competed in for 13 years.

"I started Playgym when I was 3 and just loved it. I never quit and stuck at it right through to the end of high school," she said.

"I loved learning all the tricks and being able to show off all the flips, back tucks and things like that. There are some good party tricks you learn there."

Baldacchino was also convinced by her coach to give trampolining a crack at the games, which she will compete in with five others from Gisborne.

The former Gisborne Girls' High School student is preparing to study primary school teaching at the University of Waikato and still competes in tumbling.

In the meantime, she is looking forward to competing and watching some football at the games, which are set to run for 10 days in the River City with an expected 5000 athletes participating.

"I love competing and I don't want to give it up," Baldacchino said.

"I'm really excited about it, it's good to be back training."