Genetic basis for being gay

Rod Anderson says despite research on the subject of a genetic basis for homosexuality, he hasn't come across anything that backs that idea up.

Here are a few quotes from reputable peer-reviewed journals:

"We have known for decades that sexual orientation is partly heritable in men, thanks to studies of families in which some people are straight and some people are gay.

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"In 1993, genetic variations in a region on the X chromosome in men were linked to whether they were heterosexual or homosexual, and in 1995, a region on chromosome 8 was identified."

(New Scientist, December 7, 2017).

"One study, conducted by scientists at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, offers compelling, cross-cultural evidence that common genetic factors underlie same-sex, sexual preference in men."

"... studies in molecular genetics have shown that Xq28, a region located at the tip of the X chromosome, is involved in both the expression of anxiety and male androphilia."(Science Daily).

And with reference to homosexual couples rearing children:

"There is no harm caused by same-sex parenting. Studies suggesting otherwise are skewed".

( Guardian, September 12, 2017, Jacky Hewitt, paediatrician).

"Scientific research consistently shows that gay and lesbian parents are as fit and capable as heterosexual parents, and their children are as psychologically healthy and well-adjusted as those reared by heterosexual parents."

(Wikipedia).

"Nearly two-thirds of New Zealanders back a legal change to allow gay marriage, a new poll suggests." (Stuff.co.nz July 3, 2012)

Is Rod Anderson saying that about half of those who were for gay marriage in this poll were saying "as long as they don't try to raise children"?

One last quote - Neil deGrasse Tyson said: "The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."

Unlike religion.

ELLA GRANT, RD12 Whanganui
Deja vu

Trump and Kim, Singapore, June 12, 2018.

Chamberlain and Hitler, Munich, September 29, 1938.

"... Peace in our time."

NOEL SHEPHERD, Whanganui
Organic food for thought

Even in my social isolation and hermit-like existence, I've maintained the presumption that I understand current trends in society.

This assumption was blown apart when I attended the Saturday market where all, or the majority, of the food on offer was promoted as being organic.

I had always thought that during my life so far I had consumed solely organic food and all food was organic.

My constitution does not allow me to consume non-organic food such as lightbulbs and razor blades as do some individuals.

I have obviously lost touch.

Could some of your more enlightened correspondents inform me of the bad consequences of the consumption of non-organic food compared to organic food?

Personally, I enjoy a deep-fried processed hot dog covered in processed tomato sauce when I attend the markets.

I'm assuming the ingredients are organic.

PAUL EVANS, Parkdale
Aria title answer

A few weeks ago a lady approached me in Victoria Ave asking the title of the aria from opera sung at the Riverside concert four years ago by Welsh international tenor and teacher, Dennis O'Neill.

I do not know the lady's name and thus cannot contact her.

So if, by chance, she reads this I would like to tell her that the tenor aria was from Giacomo Puccini's opera Tosca and was Recondita Armonia, translated as hidden harmony of different beauties - a famous and much admired solo.

DONALD TROTT, New Zealand Opera School
Farewell Fred

Sorry to see that Fred Frederikse's column of June 12 was his last. I have enjoyed the insight-filled journey he took us to his various millispheres very much.

Fred, Gwynne Dyer and Terry Sarten have been my favourite contributors to this paper for some time now.

Still, I am sure we will hear from Fred in these pages still from time to time - can't keep a good man down, eh Fred?

L E FITTON, Whanganui
Democrat support

Jay Kuten celebrates that Ireland has removed the legal protections for children still in their mother's wombs, allowing these children to be killed.

Mr Kuten tells us that it makes Ireland an "open, tolerant, liberal" country to allow the killing of another human being.

This is yet another attack on Christians and is followed by the outrageous attempt to make out that it was Christians in the United States who were opposed to the Civil Rights Movement.

While there may have been Christians who were opposed to the movement, there were also Christians in the movement, including the Reverend Martin Luther King jnr.

The irony of Mr Kuten's article is that the real opposition to the Civil Rights Movement was from Democrats, Mr Kuten's party, and that the Democrats have continued this opposition to human rights in their support for unrestricted access to abortion.

K A BENFELL, Gonville