Controversial bikini ads pushing an anti-immigration agenda have been one of the tactics used by a German far-right political party, which has led to the best results for a radical right wing group in Germany since World War II.

The Alternative for Germany (AfD) capitalised on increasing support after German Chancellor Angela Merkel's open door policy saw more than a million refugees and migrants to enter the country.

The media campaign, funded by the AfD and created by a Texas based advertising agency, appeals to national concerns of a growing migrant population and reflects the party's strong stance on immigration.

Campaign placards for the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) have proved controversial. Photo / AP
Campaign placards for the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) have proved controversial. Photo / AP

One of the posters shows an image of two woman dressed in bikinis and photographed from behind with a tagline that reads "Burkas? We prefer bikinis".

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Another picture shows a pregnant woman lying down on a picnic rug, smiling with a hand on her stomach beneath the tagline "New Germans? We'll make them ourselves".

The provocative adverts powered the AfD through the polls, setting the party on track to win 13.5% of the votes, which will allow them to enter the German Parliament for the first time.

This is a massive leap from the 2013 election when the party, having not long been formed, polled 4.7%, just missing out on the 5% share needed to gain representation in federal parliament.

An election campaign billboard of the right-wing Alternative for Germany (AfD) political party that reads:
An election campaign billboard of the right-wing Alternative for Germany (AfD) political party that reads: "New Germans? We'll make them ourselves!". Photo / Getty Images

During the four years since the last election, the AfD has completely transformed itself.

Starting as an anti-euro party made up of academics who opposed the power of the European Union, the AfD increased dramatically in popularity when they shifted their focus to Islam and immigration in the wake of Europe's refugee crisis.

While their nationalist views and harsh line on immigration may echo many of Donald Trump policies, it seems the AfD is not looking to align themselves with the US president.

When Alice Weidel, one of the major candidates representing the party, was asked how President Trump was affecting the Alternative for Germany and their decisions, her reply was blunt.

AfD campaign posters displayed in the male cloakroom after finishing third place in the federal elections. Photo / Getty Images
AfD campaign posters displayed in the male cloakroom after finishing third place in the federal elections. Photo / Getty Images

"There's no influence," she told reporters.

While Angela Merkel has secured a fourth term as German Chancellor, the rapid rise of the far-right AfD party making it the country's third biggest political force, could force Merkel to tighten immigration laws.

The Alternative for Germany party's success has certainly caused unease and while the party's supporters and representatives celebrated inside one of Berlin's popular clubs, outside the venue thousands of people gathered to protest.

The crowd could be heard chanting phrases such as "Nazi pigs", "Say it loud, say it clear, refugees are welcome here" and "There is no [human] right for Nazi propaganda".