Man calls police line to complain about prostitute (+ audio)

File photo / Getty Images
File photo / Getty Images

A British man has received a warning from police after calling 999 - the UK's emergency line - to complain that a prostitute he met outside a hotel was not as attractive as she had promised.

The nuisance caller claimed that the woman had "breached the Sale of Goods Act" by mis-representing her looks in a newspaper advert.

However, officers in Solihull told him that the prostitute had not committed an offence - and reminded him that he may have broken the law against soliciting for sex.

West Midlands Police have now tracked the man down and sent him a letter warning him about wasting police time with frivolous complaints.

LISTEN TO THE 999 CALL HERE:

A spokesman for the service said: "A 999 call was received by police at around 7.30pm on Tuesday evening from a man wishing to complain about a sex worker he had met on a hotel car park.

"The caller claimed that the woman had made out she was better looking than she actually was, and he wished to report her for breaching the Sale of Goods Act.

"When he raised this issue with the woman concerned, she allegedly took his car keys, ran away from the car and threw them back at him, prompting him to call police."

Prostitution is not in itself illegal in Britain, although a number of related activities are.

It is a crime to solicit for sex in a public place, pimp out someone for sex, or run a brothel. Although postcards advertising the services of prostitutes are common sights in some places, it is illegal to advertise for sex work.

"An officer in the Solihull contact centre advised the caller that no offences had been committed by the woman and that soliciting for sex was in fact illegal."

It is believed that the man had contacted the prostitute himself after she placed an advert in the paper, but it is not known whether any transaction ultimately took place.

The police statement added: "Despite the man refusing to give his details, police have been able to identify him and have sent him a letter warning him about his actions.

"Wasting police time is a serious offence and carries a maximum sentence of six months imprisonment."

Police released a recording of the 999 call, in which the man complains: "I arranged to meet with her. But beforehand I have asked for a description of her - give me an honest description, otherwise when I get there I'm not going to use your services.

"She's mis-described and misrepresented herself totally. She was angry - she thinks I owe her a living or something."

After the operator terminated the call to free up the line for genuine emergencies, Sergeant Jerome Moran called him back to offer advice on the bizarre situation.

"It was unbelievable - he genuinely believed he had done nothing wrong and that the woman should have been investigated by police for misrepresentation,' Sgt Moran said later.

"I told him that she'd not committed any offences and that it was his actions, in soliciting for sex, that were in fact illegal.

"Unhappy with the response, he then insisted on coming down to the police station to debate the matter.'

The officer continued: "On this occasion the man in question was given a warning, but wasting police time is a serious offence and carries a maximum sentence of six months imprisonment - next time he may not be so lucky."

- THE DAILY MAIL

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