120,000 lightning strikes hit in severe Australian storms

As many as 1300 people are expected to do without power in their homes for a second night after storms damaged infrastructure across South Australia.

More than 120,000 lightning strikes were recorded across the state on Friday, with as many as 14,000 an hour recorded during the evening.

The industrial town of Whyalla may not have been "wiped off the map" by the introduction of the carbon tax, as predicted by Opposition Leader Tony Abbott earlier this year, but it certainly took a battering from electrical storms, leaving more than 5000 people without power on Friday night.

Most homes have had their power restored on Saturday, but up to 300 will be without power for a second night and some may face a third night in the dark, says SA Power Networks spokesman Paul Roberts.

"We've got a huge number of localised jobs which are caused by damage by trees and debris that's fallen on lines and pulled lines down," Mr Roberts told AAP on Saturday.

"We're hopeful that we can get most people back by tomorrow night but there may be a handful (without power on Sunday night)."

Up to 3000 people in the wine regions of the Barossa and Clare valleys were without power on Friday night, and 500 will remain without power on Saturday night, Mr Roberts said.

And 500 people in Port Pirie, north of Adelaide, will also remain without power overnight.

"There's a lot of damage, and in some cases you can't restore power until you've actually replaced equipment, got lines back up," Mr Roberts said.

A spokesman for the Bureau of Meteorology said while there were still lightning storms in the vicinity on Saturday, there was not as much wind or rain so there would be limited further damage.

The storm cell would also weaken overnight, he said.

-AAP

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