Man Kaur has travelled more than 13,000km to reach Auckland, so what's 100 metres more for this remarkable 101-year-old athlete from India.

Kaur and her 79-year-old son Gurdev have arrived for the World Masters Games, where she will compete in the 100m, 200m, javelin and shot put.

After 19 hours of flying over two days, Kaur entered the Auckland Airport arrival hall in a wheelchair and happily took questions from NZME, with her son translating for the Games oldest competitor.

But when given the chance, she got up from the chair and skipped at an impressive speed through the hall, showing the form befitting a woman who trains in the gym one day and on the track the next.

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"She never feels tired," says Gurdev, who details her other athletic excursions to competitions in the United Staes (twice), Canada and Taiwan.

What's more, Gurdev reveals that two months ago, she was found to have severe osteoporosis of the spine and shows a rather graphic x-ray on his phone to prove it.

Doctors have told him: "We don't know how she runs."

But run she has, this miracle from Chandigarh, since taking up athletics at the tender age of 93, when Gurdev - who had competed in Masters for 25 years - suggested it.

Athletics authorities insisted on a medical check and she received a glowing bill of health by experts at Punjab University.

"She had no knee problems or heart problems, and I told her she should try running," says Gurdev.

2017 World Masters Games competitors 79 year old Gurdev Singh with his mother 101 year old Man Kaur arrive in Auckland on Monday night. Photo / Greg Bowker
2017 World Masters Games competitors 79 year old Gurdev Singh with his mother 101 year old Man Kaur arrive in Auckland on Monday night. Photo / Greg Bowker

At the Americas Masters in Vancouver last August, other competitors cheered her across the finish-line, after she completed the 100m in one minute and 21 seconds.

Reports told of how she smiled, with arms raised, clung to a water bottle and could hardly speak, while other athletes talked of being inspired by her efforts.

Among those who would have been impressed was Canadian Nihal "Nippy" Gil, a year older than Man Kaur, who had claimed gold in the 100-plus sprint for men, after his one expected opponent from India failed to show. In Auckland, the next oldest competitor will be Hamilton's Reg Rye, a 95-year-old who took up track cycling just a couple of years ago.

As the only 100-plus competitor, Man Kaur is assured of four golds in the 10-day Games, which begin on Friday, taking her medal haul to well over 20. One aim is to crack the one minute 10 second mark in the 100m at Trusts Stadium.

And she can't wait to hear the Indian anthem played.

She will start with the 100m on Monday, competes in the 200m and 2kg shot put on Wednesday, and rounds things off by hurling a 400g javelin on Thursday.

Gurdev is immensely proud and says father Ranjit Singh, who passed away five years ago, was also very supportive. Man Kaur's motivations include encouraging older women to run and eat well.

"If God will give me power, I will run accordingly," says a woman, who had no sporting experience until her epiphany at 93.

"Till the day I die, I will do this and may I die on the track... no problem."