A man imprisoned for stealing the Victoria Crosses from the National Army Museum has been granted parole.

Ten years ago the National Army Museum at Waiouru was hit with a burglary in which 96 medals were stolen, including nine Victoria Cross medals.

Ronnie Van Wakeren and James Kapa were convicted for the theft - the former getting 12 years and three months prison and the latter 13 years three months inside.

Van Wakeren was returned to prison for a breach of parole and Kapa was rejected - again - for parole just last month.

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Van Wakeren's breach of parole was linked to him setting up a company called RVW Online Trading Ltd. His sole shareholding and directorship in the company was found to be a breach of his parole conditions.

Back before a parole board last week, Van Wakeren was granted parole.

He told the board he had "greater insight into his offending and into his behaviour" and was prepared to be more transparent, communicative and engage better in the future.

He was serving 12 years three months sentence for 80 offences that were fraud related. His statutory release date was September 23, 2019.

Ronald Van Wakeren, left, and James Joseph Kapa appear in the Auckland District Court in the case of the stolen military medals in March 2008. Photo / NZ Herald Archive
Ronald Van Wakeren, left, and James Joseph Kapa appear in the Auckland District Court in the case of the stolen military medals in March 2008. Photo / NZ Herald Archive

The board agreed to the request for parole, as well as several recommendations like treatment with a department psychologist to support him with the "implementation of a safety plan in the community setting".

"A focus should be placed on consolidating his risk management strategies and supporting him to practise and implement these across relevant high-risk situations in the community as they are arise," the report from the parole hearing said.

The board also agreed with a recommendation that Van Wakeren engage in a whānau, or hui support meeting with his probation officer.

Further conditions of Van Wakeren's parole included undertaking any programmes as directed, including a Problem Gambling Treatment.

He was not to purchase, possess or use any electronic devices, including a mobile phone, and wasn't allowed to enter any internet cafe or other place used for accessing the internet without the written approval of a probation officer.

He was not allowed to move from his parole address, and was not to engage in the affairs of any business. trust, company or voluntary organisation without the approval of his probation officer.

Van Wakeren's fellow thief Kapa has just been told he isn't getting out this year.

At a hearing held in October, Kapa - who has accrued more than 200 convictions since 1984 - had completed rehabilitation and was working in a prison-based workshop.

His parole hearing saw Kapa "dumbfounded" when he was told his internal prison reports on his work progress was in complete contrast to his employer's view when asked.

Although the brief prison reports were positive, his employer had told the parole officer that Kapa's work "had not been favourable".