How much will the major players fork out for Gable Tostee exclusive interview?

Gable Tostee remained tight-lipped throughout his trial, but now that it's over, is he about to speak? And what are his words worth?

The man acquitted on Thursday of the murder of Warriena Wright has fascinated Australians since they first learned the grim details of what went on inside his Gold Coast apartment on August 8, 2014.

The case against him is over but non-legal questions remain. Why did he record his struggle with the New Zealand Tinder date before her fall?

Why did he walk around the block and order a pizza after Wright disappeared over his balcony?

What is he really like - behind the boasts about sleeping with 260 women, forging IDs and leading police on a high speed chase?

It's a story 60 Minutes or its rival Sunday Night would be silly to pass up, but are they willing to pay for it? Experts say the bidding war has likely already begun.

Video


"It's a case that is ripe for current affairs; audio, romance, Tinder, but viewers are mindful that there is a victim at the centre of it all and may take a dim view of anybody seen to be cashing in," David Knox, editor of TV website TV Tonight, said.

"A news story as big as this would already be on a news producer's white board and there are now various angles you could build a story around: Gable Tostee, the family of Warriena Wright, or even the impact of social media on the trial."

Another industry insider said the story would be a "huge get" and 60 Minutes - trying to rebuild its reputation after the Beirut child abduction scandal - would have a difficult decision to make.

"A news story as big as this would already be on a news producer's white board and there are now various angles you could build a story around: Gable Tostee, the family of Warriena Wright, or even the impact of social media on the trial."

Another industry insider said the story would be a "huge get" and 60 Minutes - trying to rebuild its reputation after the Beirut child abduction scandal - would have a difficult decision to make.

"He's been cleared of any charges, so there's nothing legally wrong with paying him," she said.

"But given the need for 60 Minutes to try and rebuild, they might think twice about paying big money for something like this.

"That said, it's a huge story so ... they might choose ratings over reputation."

The going rate for story like Tostee's differs depending on who you ask. An insider told news.com.au he could receive anywhere between $100-$200,000 to talk about it.

Those willing to pay would weigh up a number of factors, including commercial return. When Belle Gibson told her story to 60 Minutes, she was rumoured to have received $75,000.

Bidding on Mark Tromp - who disappeared after fleeing his Victorian farm in August only to turn up disoriented and without explanation in another state - was believed to have started at $100,000.

Video


Gordon Wood, the man acquitted of murdering his girlfriend Caroline Bryne - was reportedly paid $200,000 to tell his story.

Head of journalism at Curtin University, Joseph Fernandez, told news.com.au he understands the attraction to a Tostee tell-all.

"Now that the trial is over, there is no obstacle to other information which was blocked from the jury coming out.

"Whenever somebody has a story to tell and is refusing to speak - watching the news as he was walking out, he was very tight-lipped - there is going to be huge interest.

"I wouldn't rule out that anybody with a chequebook would be very interested in talking with Gable about his story."

But Dr Fernandez said he still feels "uncomfortable" about the prospect of paying for it.

"Why is financial incentive relevant in the first place? I can see how it might be if there were factors like travel, accommodation and time off from work that need to be considered. Then maybe you could arrive at a reasonable figure.

"But then there's the other extreme where a figure is quite clearly staggeringly high. We have to ask what conditions were imposed in return for this payment, did the person seeking payment insist on seeing the final product before publication, etc.

"Mainly I would say that if somebody has a story to tell, and that story is in the public interest, there should be no justification for money to come into the picture."

60 Minutes did not wish to comment when approached by news.com.au. Sunday Night is yet to respond.

- news.com.au

Get the news delivered straight to your inbox

Receive the day’s news, sport and entertainment in our daily email newsletter

SIGN UP NOW

© Copyright 2016, NZME. Publishing Limited

Assembled by: (static) on production bpcf04 at 08 Dec 2016 11:06:07 Processing Time: 720ms