Morgan Tait

Morgan Tait is the NZ Herald's consumer affairs reporter.

Law students blur the lines in online hit

The Auckland law students' tongue-in-cheek parody is accompanied by underpants-wearing blokes.
The Auckland law students' tongue-in-cheek parody is accompanied by underpants-wearing blokes.

A group of Auckland law students have released a feminist response to Robin Thicke's hit Blurred Lines.

In a parody filmed for last week's University of Auckland Law Revue, three female singers - Adelaide Dunn, Olivia Lubbock and Zoe Ellwood - perform their own lyrics to the catchy tune while cavorting with men in underpants.

Thicke's version, featuring topless models, has drawn a strong response from critics who believe the song is about "blurring" the lines between consensual and non-consensual sex.

Written by the 22-year-olds and produced by Milon Tesiram, the parody song features lyrics including:

"Boy you'd better quit all your sexist ways, so hear our manifesto of the modern age. It's time to undermine the masculine confines coz we don't wanna grind."

The video was part of the Law Revue, a show of 40 skits performed to 1500 people over three shows at SkyCity Theatre last week. The parody took five hours to film and one day to edit.

"We just want some people to think about the original video and some of the reactions people have had to it," she said. "It is meant to be taken tongue in cheek.

"We understand that it is a common theme in the media for particular men to have videos with women frolicking around and stuff like that.

"But the attitude of the whole thing came across to us as being quite arrogant, especially with the issue of consent, some of his lyrics were quite questionable and a bit presumptive."

The video joins dozens of other parodies, including Star Wars and Muppets versions and a male burlesque interpretation..

The song has been a global hit for Thicke, a Canadian-American R&B recording artist, topping the charts here in New Zealand as well as in Australia, Canada, the UK and Germany among many others.

In an interview with GQ magazine Thicke said the song was about breaking taboos.

- NZ Herald

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