Stability and sun bring businesswoman north to Whangarei

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Anna Sayce moved to Northland just three weeks ago and says it's perfect for her online business. Photo / John Stone
Anna Sayce moved to Northland just three weeks ago and says it's perfect for her online business. Photo / John Stone

In her search for a spiritual retreat and a little more light in her life, a UK woman eager to escape the quakes of the south said she has not just moved to Northland for the sun, but also the seismic and economic stability.

Anna Sayce was diagnosed with seasonal adjustment disorder (SAD) when she was a teenager and has spent many sunny days in NZ with family, so it was no surprise to her that she'd make the country her home.

Ms Sayce is one of the growing number of people migrating to Northland because of its political and economic stability.

She moved to Christchurch in 2010, but after the 2011 seismic activity, she fled to Blenheim - which she swears is the hay fever capital of New Zealand.

"I just wanted to live somewhere bright and warm with my condition. I can't deal with the lack of light," she said. "But allergies in Blenheim, it was terrible."

Taking a year out to travel the UK and Ireland, she said she knew she wanted to return to New Zealand to settle.

"I got my NZ residency last year under the entrepreneur category so I started researching where I could live and work."

Ms Sayce moved to Northland just three weeks ago and operates an online business of holistic health and spirituality. She runs online spirituality, emotional healing and intuitive courses from her AnnaSayce.com platform.

Having worked from home for the past eight-and-a-half years, she is based at the Orchard building in Whangarei, the new home to Northland entrepreneurs.

"When I started looking into safe regions, away from earthquakes and allergies, Northland seemed ideal."

She is renting in Whangarei, but plans to buy a house once the market cools down. The quieter life is already a good fit.

"I love Northland's environment and love nature and meditation - the UK was too fast paced.

"People are also more open to spiritual things due to the heritage and this country," she said.

She plans to grow her business, which currently serves clients in Europe, the US, the UK, Australia and Canada.

- Northern Advocate

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