Kiwi rapper Scribe will spend the next three months in a rehabilitation facility, he has revealed today.

The 38-year-old Christchurch artist, real name Malo Luafutu, posted on Instagram this afternoon about his decision to enter rehab.

Luafutu's life has been punctuated by addiction, gangs, violence and crime - issues he put on the stage with his brother and father in their play The White Guitar which premiered in 2015.

"I left school at 15, I was in gangs and a homeless junkie by the age of 17. Not many people know that about me," the five-times platinum-selling artist told the Gisborne Herald last year.

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"It's difficult (acting in the play) because it's all real, and for me it feels like it happened just yesterday."

This afternoon he thanked his family and friends for their support when he revealed his decision to enter rehab.

"If you came to The White Guitar you know my life and what I came from," he said.

"Addiction is a symptom, not a choice for me . . . I've overcome many trials and tribulations by embracing the truth, no matter how humiliating or shameful it may be."

He said he was now embarking on what would be "the greatest and most hardest crusade ever".

"For the next three months I will be in a rehabilitation facility with no contact with the outside world, no phones, no computer," he wrote.

"I will be back a better and stronger me to take this world by storm.

"Thank you to all my supporters, peace and love. Scribe."

Thank you to all my supporters. Peace & Love. S.

A post shared by Platinum Dad/Gifted Amateur (@scribe_was_here) on

Luafutu's revelation comes the day after his son's 21st birthday party.

He earlier posted a photograph of himself with his wife Kylie Taylor and their son Jackson.

The couple, who married in Samoa in December 2013, are also parents to Micah, Taylor and Malo - who the rapper often speaks about with pride on social media.

The pair grew up in Christchurch together and had an on-off relationship, splitting in 2011 before they reconciled and married.

Their wedding and love story featured in a women's magazine spread.

They looked like a happy family unit in Jackson's 21st photograph.

"Last night was my son's 21st. Thank you to all my friends and fam who came thru (sic)," the proud father wrote today alongside two photographs - one of him and his son at the party and another from many years ago when the younger Luafutu was a toddler.

Jackson turned 21 several weeks ago and Luafutu posted an equally heartfelt post on Instagram.

"Congratulations you made it! Happy 21st my boy. I'm so proud of the man you are but you'll always be my boy," he wrote.

"Life moves so fast and I'm grateful for all the time we spent growing up together... it's been real!

"At 19 years old I wasn't the perfect dad and when I turned 21 i had you and your brother, but I couldn't of asked for a better son . . . Thank you for being awesome.

"I can't take any credit - you def (sic) get that from your mum. Happy Birthday xx"

The White Guitar tells the story of the Luafutu family's migration from Samoa to New Zealand.

Luafutu's brother Matthias and father John also star in the play, which revisited a family life fraught with family violence and guilt.

The rapper's star began to rise when he released his debut album The Crusader - a nod to the Canterbury rugby team - in 2003.

Luafutu is the cousin of musicians Ladi6, real name Karolyn Tamati, and Tyra Hammond from the band Opensouls.

Another cousin, Jeff Sanft, was killed in the 2011 Christchurch earthquake.