10-year-old Carlton School student Andi-lee Duncan had butterflies in her stomach as her hair was being plaited while sitting on a white plastic chair.

A quick snip later, over 50 observers were applauding, cheering and offering words of encouragement as Andi-lee held the cut-off plaited hair in her hands.

Supporters of the Relay For Life swarmed the Cancer Society marquee at Cooks Gardens in Whanganui to witness Andi-lee's mum Narketa Duncan finish the job.

Proud mum Narketa Duncan watches as her son Conner marvels at his sister Andi-lee's new look. Photo / Jesse King
Proud mum Narketa Duncan watches as her son Conner marvels at his sister Andi-lee's new look. Photo / Jesse King

Watching Duncan, you could tell it was a task she had carried out before as she ran the clippers quickly over her daughter's head, sending large strips of hair to the ground.

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A few tears were shed, but they quickly became smiles as people celebrated what Andi-lee had just done to raise money for the Whanganui Cancer Society.

With no hair left, Andi-lee shared hugs with her family and friends and gave her little brother Conner a big smooch on the cheek.

Plenty of people dressed up on what was a warm sunny day at Cooks Gardens, including this pair dressed as B1 and a much riper B2. Photo / Bevan Conley
Plenty of people dressed up on what was a warm sunny day at Cooks Gardens, including this pair dressed as B1 and a much riper B2. Photo / Bevan Conley

Andi-lee suffers from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and treats it using a low dose of a medication used by some cancer patients.

She wanted to shave her hair off since 2015 and raised funds for over a month through Givealittle, a fun day in Eltham and donations from Mad Butcher Wanganui.

Andi-lee also sold her plaited hair to Freedom Hair and donated those proceeds to her cause. Freedom Hair make and sell wigs.

She won't be alone in being bald when she returns to school on Monday, as her classmate Maddison Williams also cut her hair off for a cause last week.

Oscar Laird from Fordell gained himself superhero status going for a run in the Whanganui Relay For Life. Photo / Bevan Conley
Oscar Laird from Fordell gained himself superhero status going for a run in the Whanganui Relay For Life. Photo / Bevan Conley

The Relay For Life is a 12-hour event running from 10am until 10pm and in 2019 it featured 40 teams.

One member of each team must be walking around the track at all times during the event and live bands provide entertainment throughout.

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The funds raised at the event go towards things like Cancer Society operational costs, transport costs for patients, one-on-one support and more.

The Wanganui Tramping Club is full of members fit enough to participate in a relay. Photo / Bevan Conley
The Wanganui Tramping Club is full of members fit enough to participate in a relay. Photo / Bevan Conley

Last year the Whanganui Relay For Life gained the Cancer Society a profit of $53,906.04, which was $10,000 more than in 2017.

A post on the Whanganui Cancer Society Facebook page said that the 2019 event has raised $30,800 so far, with admission at the gate and merchandise still to be tallied.

The Whanganui Chronicle will report a final figure when it becomes available in a week or two.

Forget the Crusaders, these are the CURE-saders. Fight for the cure. Fight for our families. Photo / Bevan Conley
Forget the Crusaders, these are the CURE-saders. Fight for the cure. Fight for our families. Photo / Bevan Conley
Margaret McAra, Michelle Jardine and Scarlett Able took part in the survivor's lap to get the event started. Photo / Bevan Conley
Margaret McAra, Michelle Jardine and Scarlett Able took part in the survivor's lap to get the event started. Photo / Bevan Conley