The message was clear: enough is enough and violence in New Zealand needs to stop now.
More than 80 people turned up to a candlelight vigil in Whangārei tonight to honour slain English tourist Grace Millane and all victims of violence.

The vigil was only organised this morning and one of the organisers, Pauline Townsend said the slogan was "Northland says no".

"It's a vigil not just for Grace but everyone that has lost their life to violence,'' Townsend said.

Jackie Vinson and son Blake wanted to express their horror at the violence in society and to show their support for English tourist Grace Millane and all victims of violence. Photo / Mike Dinsdale
Jackie Vinson and son Blake wanted to express their horror at the violence in society and to show their support for English tourist Grace Millane and all victims of violence. Photo / Mike Dinsdale

She said the murder of Grace Millane, the British backpacker who had arrived in New Zealand just days before she was killed, had brought concerns about violence to the forefront.

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"Everybody is just so shocked. It has to stop. We have to be kind to each other."

Grace Millane was last seen alive on December 1, the day before her 22nd birthday. Her body was eventually found in bush on the side of Scenic Drive in the Waitakere Ranges on Sunday. The 26-year-old man accused of Millane's murder appeared in court on Monday and was granted interim name suppression.

Whangārei kaumatua Fred Tito had messages of aroha for the family of Grace Millane and all victims of violence at tonight's vigil on Whangarei's Canopy Bridge. Photo / Mike Dinsdale
Whangārei kaumatua Fred Tito had messages of aroha for the family of Grace Millane and all victims of violence at tonight's vigil on Whangarei's Canopy Bridge. Photo / Mike Dinsdale

Another of the organisers Shaye Corich said Grace should have been able to walk New Zealand's streets in safety.

''Everybody should be able to do that.''

Kaumatua Fred Tito said enough is enough and violence against women and children needed to stop.

More than 80 people turned up to a candlelight vigil in Whangārei tonight in honour of slain English tourist Grace Millane and all victims of violence. Photo Mike Dinsdale.
More than 80 people turned up to a candlelight vigil in Whangārei tonight in honour of slain English tourist Grace Millane and all victims of violence. Photo Mike Dinsdale.

Tonight's Whangārei vigil is one of dozens that have been held around the country after Grace's death as New Zealand mourns her death and sends its aroha to her family.

Shardae Noone and Catilyn Burrell attended tonight's Whangārei vigil and said they wanted to show their support for Grace's family and to condemn the country's violence.

''Grace should a have been able to walk around safely here. She was a visitor to New Zealand and we are a safe country so this should not have happened,'' Caitlyn said.

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Tito told the crowd that violence was a big issue in New Zealand, but it was not something the police and government alone would deal with.

It was, Tito said, something that all of society had to tackle.

A minute's silence was held at the end of the vigil to honour Grace and all victims of violence and their families.