At least 50 keen sailors are expected to watch tomorrow's America's Cup racing at Blair Tuke's old sailing club - but, without Sky, they'll have to hide smartphones and radios until the delayed footage is broadcast on Prime.

Kerikeri Cruising Club commodore Doug France said his nerves wouldn't let him wait so he'd have to check the result of the 5am race before heading to the clubrooms, but he promised not to tell anyone.

"It would be a hell of a big ask [to not look up the results], I'm just too nervous. But I'm not as nervous as I was before this morning's races."

Team NZ needs just one more win to take out the Cup.

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The doors would open at the club at 6am with the delayed coverage due to kick off at 6.30am. A sponsor was covering the cost of breakfast for the first 25 members through the door, though everyone was welcome to come along and watch or order brekkie.

Team NZ sailor Blair Tuke learned to sail at the club as a youngster on Lake Manuwai before joining the Kerikeri High School sailing squad under the legendary Derry Godbert, later going on to become world champion in the 49er class along with Peter Burling.

Cyclors are, from left, Blair Tuke, Andy Maloney, Josh Junior and Simon Van Velthooven. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Cyclors are, from left, Blair Tuke, Andy Maloney, Josh Junior and Simon Van Velthooven. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Tuke has been named a life member of the club and still called in and helped with coaching when he was in Kerikeri. Despite his successes, he remained a very unassuming and pleasant man, France said.

Tuke's mother, Karin, lived right next door to the clubrooms.

Another Team NZ crew member, Andy Maloney, also got his start in sailing at the Kerikeri Cruising Club, while helmsman Peter Burling's grandparents and some cousins live in Kerikeri.

France had high praise for the Kiwi helmsman's skill and sheer unpredictability, which had put his Oracle counterpart Jimmy Spithill under pressure and caused him to make costly mistakes.