BAY NEWS

Wonky donkeys, traditional Maori games and an Easter egg hunt will be sure to entertain children these Easter school holidays.

Craig Smith, aka The Wonky Donkey man, is heading to Paihia and Kerikeri for three shows later this month.

Armed with his guitar and a team of puppets, Smith will perform infectious songs from his much-loved books; The Wonky Donkey and Kaha the Kea, along with new releases the Drizzly Bear and Scariest Thing In The Garden.

The one-hour interactive show is aimed at children aged 2 to 10 and is packed with singing, dancing, and a whole bunch of laughs.

It's being held at the Waitaha Events Centre, Copthorne Hotel & Resort in Paihia, 10.30am and 1pm on April 22, and at the Cornerstone Church Whare Karakia o Manako in Kerikeri, April 23 from 10.30am.

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These will be Smith's final shows for 2019 as he takes a break from touring to focus on the launch of his sequel to The Wonky Donkey ... The Dinky Donkey, which Northland fans will be among the first to hear.

Tickets are available from www.eventfinda.co.nz for $10 plus a booking fee.

Māori games

The Waitangi Treaty Grounds' Education team is holding a traditional Māori games day on April 24 led by ngā taonga tākaro expert Harko Brown.

A tama taiki (children's basket), traditional play equipment made from supplejack vines by Harko Brown during a cultural festival in Auckland. Photo / Cuni de Graaf
A tama taiki (children's basket), traditional play equipment made from supplejack vines by Harko Brown during a cultural festival in Auckland. Photo / Cuni de Graaf

The session runs from 10am to 3pm on the upper Treaty Grounds lawn and is open to all ages.

Children and adults can take part in fun activities designed to encourage team and confidence building, and learn about the game's peace protocols, 'he rongonui aroha'.

Also at the Waitangi Treaty Grounds is the popular Easter Egg Hunt on April 21.

The free event for children aged under 12 gets going at 11am at the main entrance, and the hunt for chocolate goodies starts at 11.30am with the event wrapping up around 1pm.

Don't forget, children must be accompanied by an adult.

Family fun

Otehei Bay's Easter Family Fun Day is back again on April 20, packed with loads of activities for the whole family.

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Kid's games will be run by Project Island Song and there will also be face painting, live music by Moondog Bleuz, island walks, kayaking and giant jenga.

Events start from 11.30am and there are ferries leaving at 8.30am and 10.30am.

Don't forget to bring a gold coin donation to help Project Island Song.

Village fundraiser

The Kerikeri Retirement Village's annual fete raised more than $1000.

The Kerikeri Retirement Village is thrilled with funds raised at a recent fete. Photo / Due North PR
The Kerikeri Retirement Village is thrilled with funds raised at a recent fete. Photo / Due North PR

The event was held on March 30 and the funds will go towards the construction of a soothing water feature for the benefit of dementia patients in the Tui Wing.

Kerikeri Retirement Village chief executive Hilary Sumpter thanked village residents, their families and members of the wider Kerikeri community for their support.

Russell exhibition

A new piece of Bay of Islands history was revealed at a Russell Museum exhibition opening on April 5.

Swedish Vice Consul Frank Olsson, Kororāreka Marae Chairperson Deb Rewiri, Swedish Deputy Head of Mission Henrik Grudemo, Ngāti Wai/Te Kapotai kaumatua Te Warahi Hetaraka and Tawhiti Hook from Te Rāwhiti at the Russell Museum's Solander Exhibition pōwhiri and opening. Photo / Stephen Western
Swedish Vice Consul Frank Olsson, Kororāreka Marae Chairperson Deb Rewiri, Swedish Deputy Head of Mission Henrik Grudemo, Ngāti Wai/Te Kapotai kaumatua Te Warahi Hetaraka and Tawhiti Hook from Te Rāwhiti at the Russell Museum's Solander Exhibition pōwhiri and opening. Photo / Stephen Western

Paradise Lost

is an exhibition looking at the life and achievements of the distinguished Swedish botanist Daniel Solander.

A series of paintings by 10 New Zealand artists reflect on Solander's life as a noted botanist, traveller and early cross-cultural exponent.

The opening was attended by Henrik Grudemo, the Deputy Head of Mission at the Swedish Embassy.

Grudemo acknowledged Solander's involvement in a shooting that took place in the Bay in 1769.

It happened on Motuarohia (Roberton Island) shortly after Captain James Cook had brought the Endeavour into the Bay on that famous voyage of discovery 250 years ago.

Solander was one of the chief scientists on board.

Kaumatua Te Warahi Hetaraka revealed that it was his tupuna, the Ngare Raumati rangatira Te Koukou, who had been shot through the thigh by Solander during a confrontation.

Surprisingly, there was no further violence in the Bay after Te Koukou's wounding.

It's believed that the Tahitian high priest, master navigator and translator, Tupaia, who was also on-board Endeavour, acted as a peacemaker.

Te Koukou gifted two of his personal ornaments, a heru, or comb, and rei puta niho pendant to Tupaia.

They later found their way into Captain Cook's collection of artefacts now in the British Museum in London.

Hetaraka recited the ancient chant Tuai to highlight the need to work to heal wounds and spoke of the need for tuia, the binding together of different communities into one entity.

The exhibition runs daily until May 19.

Wearable arts

Time to rummage through the shed and see what treasures can be found in time for the Trash 2 Flash Wearable Arts show.

The Whangaroa College and Whanau Focus Group event encourages students to turn their trash into something flash for the big reveal on May 25.

There are numerous categories and themes for all ages and it's free to enter. Email trash2flash@gmail.com for more information and entry forms.

New exhibition

Nigel Oxley – My Father's War

is a new exhibition showing at Art at Wharepuke in Kerikeri.

In 1942 Oxley's father Lance Sergeant Cecil Oxley, of the Royal Artillery, was taken as a prisoner of war at the fall of Tobruk in Libya.

He was held prisoner of war in Italy then later trucked to Germany.

He spent the remainder of the war at Stalag IVB near Muhlberg until the camp was liberated in 1945.

The exhibition, which runs from April 18 to May 19, features artefacts relating to his death, that Nigel Oxley found when he was sorting through boxes of his father's effects. The gallery is open seven days from 10am to 5pm.

Netball heroes

All eyes were on two young Whangarei netball fans as they met their netball heroes on centre court in the ANZ Premiership on April 7.

Netball fans Jessica-James Wikaira and Brodie-Lee Barber met their heroes, Mystics captain Michaela Sokolich-Beatson and Tactix captain Jane Watson. Photo / supplied
Netball fans Jessica-James Wikaira and Brodie-Lee Barber met their heroes, Mystics captain Michaela Sokolich-Beatson and Tactix captain Jane Watson. Photo / supplied

Fifteen-year-old Jessica-James Wikaira won the opportunity to meet Mystics captain Michaela Sokolich-Beatson and Tactix captain Jane Watson through the ANZ Future Captains competition. Jessica-James' friend Brodie-Lee Barber, also 15, joined her for the exciting on-court experience.

"My favourite part was getting to watch a game live," Jessica-James said. "I also liked getting to meet the captains and having my photo taken with them."

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