COMMENT

In the late 1830s one of the most enthusiastic Māori supporters of Pākehā ideas about religion, dress, tools and governance; including the institution of British rule as represented by newly appointed Governor Hobson, was the Christian Te Rarawa Chief Nopera Panekareao.

When the idea of ceding the sovereignty of Aotearoa to the British Crown, with the Crown also holding sole pre-eminent rights to purchase land, was explained to him, he described his understanding of the transaction in a famous phrase: "The shadow of the land will pass to the Crown, but the substance remains with us."

But barely a

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