A massive visitor appears to be enjoying the Bay lifestyle.

Onlookers watched on from Mount Main Beach yesterday as the adult southern right whale enjoyed rolling on the surface of the water before resting on the sand below.

It is believed to be the same whale spotted off Papamoa shores the previous day which has been creating a stir since it arrived.

Phill Drongool called the Bay of Plenty Times from his kayak which floated only metres before the whale.

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I've seen plenty of other things from the air, stingrays and sharks and what-not, but I've never seen a whale so it was pretty impressive.

Mr Drongool had the chance to see up-close the whale swimming on the surface before diving below close to the sand

"I'm still buzzing, it was pretty cool," Mr Drongool said.

The estimated 9m-long whale was also spotted from the air as local pilot Cole Mossman circled above.

"I've seen plenty of other things from the air, stingrays and sharks and what-not, but I've never seen a whale so it was pretty impressive," Mr Mossman said.

"It was pretty sweet to see."

Tauranga Department of Conservation ranger Pete Huggins was certain it was the same southern right whale spotted off Papamoa shores on Tuesday afternoon.

BIG IMPRESSION: A southern right whale surfaces for air with Mauao in the background. PHOTOS/PHILL DRONGOOL/WWW.RLINE.CO.NZ/WHALES
BIG IMPRESSION: A southern right whale surfaces for air with Mauao in the background. PHOTOS/PHILL DRONGOOL/WWW.RLINE.CO.NZ/WHALES

"It's been slowly making its way around the coastline and has just chosen this location to stop to have a rest," Mr Huggins said.

It was not unusual to see a southern right whale in shallow waters but not so common in the Bay of Plenty.

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"We know that they migrate up the coast of New Zealand and they stay often in the shallows. They're well-known in the East Cape, Opotiki and occasionally this far around [in the Bay of Plenty]."

Mr Huggins urged people to stay out of the water and to avoid getting into boats or vessels to get close to the whale.

"The biggest risk to the animal is boat strike or getting spooked by boats or people in the water," he said.

"This could lead to the animal becoming stranded."

BIG IMPRESSION: A southern right whale surfaces for air with Mauao in the background. PHOTOS/PHILL DRONGOOL/WWW.RLINE.CO.NZ/WHALES
BIG IMPRESSION: A southern right whale surfaces for air with Mauao in the background. PHOTOS/PHILL DRONGOOL/WWW.RLINE.CO.NZ/WHALES