Donald Trump shuffles transition team as protests continue across the US

By Anna Caldwell, News Corp Australia Network, staff writers

Donald Trump has revealed some details of the phone call he got from Hillary Clinton on election night, as audio emerged of what she told her volunteers.

Trump said Clinton's phone call of congratulations was "lovely".

In an interview with 60 Minutes America, to be aired in the US on Sunday, the US President-elect conceded it would have been a tough call to make.

"Hillary called and it was a lovely call and it was a tough call for her," Trump tells reporter Lesley Stahl, adding "tougher than I can imagine".

Trump said his opponent "couldn't have been nicer".

"She just said congratulations Donald, well done," he says in the interview, his first since winning the race to the White House.

Trump describes Clinton as "very strong" and "very smart".


He said he also received a phone call from Bill Clinton the next day.

"He couldn't have been more gracious," Trump says in the 60 Minutes interview.

"He said it was one of the most amazing wins he has ever seen".

Trump yesterday said he would contact Barack Obama for advice if needed in the course of his presidency. Asked if he would also turn to Mr Clinton, Trump didn't rule it out saying he would think about it.

Trump's son heckled by teens in New York

Trump's son Eric Trump and his wife, Lara Yunaska, were heckled on the streets of New York by a group of teenagers.

The New York Post reports the couple were walknig without security and went to Quality Italian on 57th Street around 9.30pm local time, where they met friends who congratulated Eric on his father's victory.

Ahen they left, a group of about eight teens yelled, "Eric - f **k your father!"

Another shouted, "Loves Trumps Hate!"

While Eric briefly turned to face them, they moved on swiftly.

Donald Trump and his son Eric Trump embrace after delivering his acceptance speech at the New York Hilton Midtown. Photo / Getty Images
Donald Trump and his son Eric Trump embrace after delivering his acceptance speech at the New York Hilton Midtown. Photo / Getty Images

Clinton's message to her volunteers

Audio of a conference call that Hillary Clinton joined to thank her volunteers has emerged.

Clinton's message contained her sincere appreciation of everyone who "embodied" the campaign and worked around the clock to get Americans to get out and vote. She also said that "these have been very, very tough days".

'Mum kicked me out after I voted for Trump'

Shocking video has emerged of a mum forcing her son out of their home after he voted for Donald Trump, as the President-elect chose his transition team.

The video, which was being circulated widely across social media, showed a Texan mother who kicked her young son out of their home after he 'voted' for Trump in a mock election at school, TMZ reports.

The child screamed as his mother forced him outside and on to the street with his suitcase and a sign explaining why he had left home.

"Since you voted for Donald Trump. You can get your sh** and get out," his mother said.

As the young boy stood there crying she added: "So when the people see you outside, they know why you're standing out there."

"You wanna vote for him, I'm going to show ya," she added.

"Get your suitcase and get out! We don't do Donald Trump here."

The boy said he voted for Trump because he saw him on TV a lot.

Trump's transition shake-up

The emotional fallout from the election comes as three of Trump's adult children - Don. Jr., Eric and Ivanka - are on the transition executive committee, along with Jared Kushner, Ivanka's husband.

Read more:
It's a family affair: Donald Trump puts kids in charge

Kushner played a significant role in Trump's campaign and was spotted at the White House Thursday meeting with President Barack Obama's chief of staff.

The children's inclusion raises questions about the role the Trump family will play in the White House - as well as Trump's ability to sever ties between the administration and sprawling family business - after the celebrity businessman repeatedly said during the campaign that his grown children would not follow him to Washington and instead run the Trump Organization.

Vice President-elect Mike Pence was elevated to head the operations, a demotion for New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who had been running Trump's transition planning for months.

Family members (L to R) Eric Trump, Donald Trump Jr. and Ivanka Trump are on the transition executive committee. Photo / Getty Images
Family members (L to R) Eric Trump, Donald Trump Jr. and Ivanka Trump are on the transition executive committee. Photo / Getty Images

More protests over Trump election

For a third night, more anti-Trump protests erupted in the US.

The demonstrations kicked off early Friday afternoon, with protesters once again grouping at Trump Tower in New York and other spots across the nation.

The daytime protests on Friday were peaceful after a night of demonstrations in at least 25 cities, CNN reports.

Anti-Donald Trump protesters march in the street on Fifth Avenue in New York City. Photo / Getty Images
Anti-Donald Trump protesters march in the street on Fifth Avenue in New York City. Photo / Getty Images

In Portland, Oregon, rowdy protests continued for a second night as hundreds of people took to the streets. Police used flash-bang grenades in an effort to disperse the crowd. Some protesters spray-painted graffiti and threw items at officers. Authorities said vandalism and assault had taken place during the rally, which organizers had billed as peaceful earlier in the day. There were also spirited demonstrations on college campuses and along downtown streets were mostly peaceful following previous outbreaks of window-smashing and fire-setting.

Evening marches disrupted traffic in Miami and Atlanta.

Trump does a U-turn on Obamacare

It comes as the president-elect said he will consider an "amended" version of Barack Obama's signature health care law - a sign of a shift in position after repeatedly vowing on the campaign trail that he would repeal the measure.

Trump explained in an interview with The Wall Street Journal that his shift came after his talks with Obama, who asked him to consider preserving parts of the health care law.

"Either Obamacare will be amended, or repealed and replaced," Trump told the newspaper.

"I told him I will look at his suggestions, and out of respect, I will do that."

Trump tweets praise for protesters

And it comes after Trump tweeted about the "passion" his protesters have for the country.

"Love the fact that the small groups of protesters last night have passion for our great country. We will all come together and be proud," he tweeted.


It was a change of tone from last night when protests raged in Democratic stronghold cities for a third night and Mr Trump took to Twitter.

"Just had a very open and successful presidential election. Now professional protesters, incited by the media, are protesting. Very unfair!" he wrote


Later, he flagged that he had a "busy day" and that he would make announcements soon about who he was going to bring into his administration.


Women to march against Trump

Women anxious that a Trump presidency in the United States could set back or destroy many of their rights are planning a massive march in Washington.

The march is planned for January 21, 2017, the day after Trump is to be sworn into office, at Washington, DC's Lincoln Memorial.

On Facebook, where the Million Women March is being organised, some 35,000 people said they would attend within the first 24 hours after it was announced, said Bob Bland, an organiser based in New York.

The march comes in response to Trump's attitudes toward women that emerged during his campaign against Democrat Hillary Clinton, Bland told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Trump insulted female reporters, a political rival and other women over their looks, and a video surfaced in which he could be heard bragging about groping women and making unwanted sexual advances.

The video prompted several women to say publicly that Trump had groped them. Trump denied their allegations and dismissed his words as "locker room talk".

During the campaign Trump also said abortion should be largely banned, that the US Supreme Court ruling Roe v Wade legalising abortion should be overturned and that he would appoint an anti-abortion justice to the nation's highest court. He said women who had abortions should be punished, but later retracted this, saying that doctors who perform abortions should be punished.

"We cannot allow ourselves to give up, put our heads down and not hold this administration accountable for any violation of human rights or women's rights," Bland said.

On the flip side, white supremacist group the Ku Klux Klan will hold a victory party to celebrate Trump's win. The Loyal White Knights, which purports to have at least 200 members, will hold a parade on December 3 in North Carolina.

Immigration reform top of Trump's agenda

As world markets defied expectations and continued to rally on the back of the Trump presidency, the Republican leader was keen to revive America after being swept to power by the working class.

"We can't get started fast enough," Mr Trump said yesterday after a strategy meeting with Speaker of the US House of Representatives Senator Paul Ryan.

U.S. veteran Henry Espinosa hollers at a Trump supporter during a protest in opposition of President-elect Donald Trump in Miami. Photo: AP
U.S. veteran Henry Espinosa hollers at a Trump supporter during a protest in opposition of President-elect Donald Trump in Miami. Photo: AP

"We're going to lower taxes as you know. We're going to fix health care, make it more affordable, and better. We're going to do a real job for the public. That's what we want to do and that's why we're excited."

Mr Trump also flagged job growth: "We're looking at jobs. Big league jobs."

When asked to narrow it to his top three priorities, he said better control of immigration and the boarders, health care and jobs.

It's the clearest indication he's given on his top legislative priorities.

Immigration is one of Mr Trump's more controversial, and signature, policies, which involves increasing deportation of criminal undocumented citizens in a tough on law and order move.

US President Barack Obama meets with US President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. Photo / AP
US President Barack Obama meets with US President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. Photo / AP

It is unlikely he was referring to his wall concept, which his closet aides admit will take some time.

Mr Trump also signalled he would move quickly on executive orders and legislation: "We'll be working on them very rapidly, and I think we're going to put things up very quickly."

In a symbolic moment of the injection of the ultimate outsider into the White House, Mr Trump revealed yesterday he had never met Mr Obama before despite the pair lashing each other publicly for years.

It was a meeting that had every potential to be painfully cringe-worthy - Mr Trump found his political fortune in 2011 when he questioned Mr Obama's birthplace, and just last week Mr Obama painted Mr Trump as an existential threat to America.

But yesterday, that was behind them as they met privately for 90 minutes in a show of unity before making comments to the press as they sat side-by-side.

"I want to emphasise to you, Mr President-elect, that we now are going to want to do everything we can to help you succeed because if you succeed, then the country succeeds," Mr Obama said.

Mr Trump's tone has shifted dramatically since winning the election.

Yesterday, he respected Mr Obama's authority, saying the meeting was "a great honour", adding that he never expected their conversation to last so long.

"I have great respect," he said, referring to Mr Obama.

"We discussed a lot of different situations, some wonderful, and some difficulties. I very much look forward to dealing with the president in the future, including counsel."

Mr Obama and Hillary Clinton this week said it was crucial America supports Mr Trump in the White House.

Meanwhile, Mr Trump's wife Melania had tea with Michelle Obama and was given a tour of the White House.

- with wires

- news.com.au

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