Sideswipe

A daily look at life's oddities by Ana Samways

Sideswipe: Feb 6: A small hiccup

13 comments
'I prefer Lavender ... But hey, each to his own', writes Stefan, who spotted the sign at a Northcote dollar shop. Photo / Supplied
'I prefer Lavender ... But hey, each to his own', writes Stefan, who spotted the sign at a Northcote dollar shop. Photo / Supplied

"I put a job ad on Seek yesterday morning and was inundated with applications within minutes," writes a reader. "Going through them one by one is made that much easier by those who don't get things quite right and are easily eliminated. My favourite was the guy who wanted to explain that one of his 'weaknesses' was being a workaholic, but ended up saying he was a work alcoholic."

Be careful with Facebook
Patient confidentiality? Not on Facebook. Dr Amy Dunbar, an obstetrician/gynaecologist at a St Louis hospital, is in trouble after she posted disparaging comments about a patient on her Facebook page. She complained the unidentified patient was constantly late for appointments, prompting her to write, "May I show up late for her delivery?" When a colleague suggested she cancel the woman's elective caesarean section, Dunbar explained she had put up with the lateness so far because the patient's previous birth was stillborn. While she does not name the patient, critics say the personal information she disclosed could identify who she is talking about. A hospital spokesperson said the comments were "definitely inappropriate".

Girls targeted for foul language
Everyday sexism: Girls at a Catholic high school in northern New Jersey have implemented a "no swearing" rule - but only for girls. At assembly, the girls were asked to stand up and vow, "I swear not to swear. So help me God." In response to concerns about a double standard, one teacher said she wanted "ladies to act like ladies". Teachers hoped if the girls cleaned up their language at school it would rub off on the boys. The rewards for ditching foul language? Lollipops and pins featuring pink lips.

Scepticism - and then a refund
"I bought a pair of shoes from The Warehouse for my 13-year-old for school," writes a reader. "After one day the soles were breaking right across the ball of the foot. When I took them back, they seemed reluctant to refund my money, and asked my child suspiciously if she'd been riding her bike, skateboard or scooter in them. No, she'd just worn them at school. I did get a refund after a discussion."

Store can track purchases
"The Warehouse can track your purchase through their system even if you do not have a receipt," explains this reader. "As long as you know the date and close to the time and around how much your total purchase was, they can find it and print it out."

Leave it to the police
"All this fuss about rego stickers!" exclaims Ted. "New South Wales has now done away with them - the cop cars have on-board cameras that read your number plates and sound an alarm if your car is unregistered, stolen or if there are outstanding warrants."

Play this: Waitangi Day Bingo anyone?

Facebook Update: This is funny, but also terribly, terribly mean...

Picture this: Beetle dioramas (Anthropomorphic taxidermy)

Quick clip #1: Compassion for a disabled goldfish

Quick clip #2: How cold is it in Montreal? Real cold.

Got a Sideswipe? Send your pictures, links and anecdotes to Ana at ana.samways@nzherald.co.nz

- NZ Herald

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