Silver service foiled

A reader writes: "I had a piece of tinfoil covering a chilli bean dish overnight and this morning it has holes in it and the food has deposits of tinfoil residue lying on top in a most sinister fashion! It's like the food has eaten into the tinfoil. My question is, if it's done this to the tinfoil, what might it do to our digestive systems when we and our guests ingest it tonight?"

Sea shells sees smells

The story abut the unwashed clamshells being used to pave an access road (and then stinking up the neighbourhood in Rhode Island) actually played out in Avondale 20 years ago. According to a reader: "An Avondale company specialising in seafood extracts from green-lipped mussels was looking at innovative ways of disposing of the tons of waste crushed mussel shells," writes a reader. "The Avondale Racecourse took the waste byproduct and laid it down on the racetrack. Same result as Rhode Island, the stench, flies and seagulls had the neighbours complaining so the company had to contract a waste contractor to dispose of the shells."

Advertisement

All parenting styles problematic

A study released by the California Parenting Institute Tuesday shows that every style of parenting inevitably causes children to grow into profoundly unhappy adults. "Our research suggests that while overprotective parenting ultimately produces adults unprepared to contend with life's difficulties, highly permissive parenting leads to feelings of bitterness and isolation throughout adulthood," lead researcher Daniel Porter said. "And, interestingly, we found that anything between those two extremes is equally damaging, always resulting in an adult who suffers from some debilitating combination of unpreparedness and isolation. Despite great variance in parenting styles across populations, the end product is always the same: a profoundly flawed and joyless human being." The study did find, however, that adults often achieve temporary happiness when they have children of their own to perpetuate the cycle of human misery. (source: The Onion)

Romance reality check

Photo editor Kathleen Kamphausen recreates bodice ripper covers using average Joes instead of Fabios, and they're wonderful. Pictured is Tender is the Storm.
Photo editor Kathleen Kamphausen recreates bodice ripper covers using average Joes instead of Fabios, and they're wonderful. Pictured is Tender is the Storm.

.

Video pick

Proper Possum massage...


Got a Sideswipe? Send your pictures, links and anecdotes to Ana at ana.samways@nzherald.co.nz