The minor parties are licking their wounds and looking at what the future holds after a brutal election that saw just five parties getting back in Parliament.

After three terms of ACT working with National, party leader David Seymour now faces being passed over in favour of a National-New Zealand First coalition.

Seymour wasn't surprised Prime Minister Bill English had indicated a preference for a two-party government, but predicted Winston Peters' party would "implode" before the next election, based on his track record.

"So we may be going into 2020 with ACT as one of only four parties in Parliament, and the only one that is standing up for those New Zealanders that are fiscally conservative and socially liberal."

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Whether Peters chose Labour or National, ACT would relish the chance to call out the Government.

"I expect ACT will play a valuable role in holding Winston Peters and that government to account."

ACT party leader David Seymour said he was proud to win his Epsom electorate once again. Photo / Matthew Theunissen
ACT party leader David Seymour said he was proud to win his Epsom electorate once again. Photo / Matthew Theunissen

ACT won a paltry 0.5 per cent of the party vote, which Seymour blamed partly on the media for turning the election into a two-horse race.

But he said it was a great honour to be elected Epsom MP and his office would be open from 9am on Monday.

In Parliament, Seymour's End of Life Choice Bill could be voted on by the end of the year and that would be a major focus.

He said ACT was experiencing a "youth tremor" and now had a new beginning. He was looking forward to rebuilding the party as a more experienced MP.

The Opportunities Party leader Gareth Morgan is reflecting on his future as leader of the party. Photo/Mark Mitchell
The Opportunities Party leader Gareth Morgan is reflecting on his future as leader of the party. Photo/Mark Mitchell

The Opportunities Party leader Gareth Morgan on Saturday called New Zealand voters selfish and said older Kiwis were "screwing the younger generation".

TOP's communications manager Sean Plunket tonight said Morgan stood by those comments.

"He believes that for New Zealand to progress people are going to have to vote outside their own narrow self interest."

Morgan also said the Greens should be willing to negotiate with National - which Greens leader James Shaw has indicated is unlikely.

Plunket said in the Greens' place TOP would have negotiated.

"Our deal with the Nats would be, 'We'll get you over the line on confidence and supply, you kick David Seymour for touch and give us three to four policies. Top of that would be an environment policy - probably cleaning up waterways and giving a price for water," Plunket said.

TOP won 2.2 per cent of the party vote. It is still expecting a bump from the special votes, many of which are expected to be young people and overseas voters.

Morgan's style of leadership was not to blame for the party failing to reach 5 per cent and he "absolutely" has the party's support as leader, Plunket said.

"But Gareth also recognises he's going to be 67 next time and he's got a life to live. We have to look at a leadership structure that's different."

TOP members and candidates would touch base once things had died down to look at the future, but Plunket said there was plenty of excitement about 2020.

"We are the fifth largest party in New Zealand so it's not going anywhere."

United Future leader Damian Light with partner Josh Harding. The party will be restructuring under Light's leadership. Photo / Nick Reed
United Future leader Damian Light with partner Josh Harding. The party will be restructuring under Light's leadership. Photo / Nick Reed

United Future leader Damian Light was "devastated" the party was out of Parliament after winning no seats and 0.1 per cent of the popular vote.

He has been leader for barely a month after party leader and Ohariu MP Peter Dunne stepped down. Ohariu had been a United Future stronghold but this election Labour's Greg O'Conner took the seat, leaving United Future without representation in Parliament.

But Light said it was always a battle for minor parties to get attention in New Zealand.

Both Light and Morgan were saddened that the Maori Party was also gone from Parliament.

"One of the things I'm most disappointed about is it looks like MMP is failing us. Twenty-one years on, we've only got five parties in Parliament," Light said.

"MMP is all about diversity and representation, but all we ended up with is what we had before - with a couple less parties and it's all down to what New Zealand First is going to do."

He wanted the "magical 5 per cent" MMP threshold scrapped completely. "All it does is discourage other parties from standing."

The party has not yet met to talk about its future, but he said with a new leader at the helm it was a chance to restructure.

Light - who shot to fame earlier this month after being compared to movie star Ryan Gosling after a debate performance - is still determined to become an MP one day.

"There's a whole lot of stuff I'm concerned about that's not going to happen - drug reform is my biggest concern and no other parties have shown an interest," Light said.

"And the other big issues, inequality, housing, climate change - I just don't think National or a New Zealand First-Labour government will take action. I'd love to be proven wrong but I'm not hopeful."