Theologians wanting to see if the Rapture was real should have made a study of Labour's campaign launch on Sunday.

The Auckland Town Hall was the scene and the cause was the Jassiah - as Jacinda Ardern has been dubbed courtesy of her reincarnation effect on the Labour Party.

The supporters had flocked in, filling the Town Hall and the Q Theatre and another overflow area. Organisers estimated upward of 2200. They sang "everybody let's do this" - a riff on the "everybody let's party".

When MC Michele A'Court warned some construction was underway behind the stage curtains, it raised hopes of a Miley Cyrus style Wrecking Ball entrance by Ardern.

Advertisement
A Labour supporter congratulates Jacinda Arden after her Labour campaign launch speech. Photo / Michael Craig
A Labour supporter congratulates Jacinda Arden after her Labour campaign launch speech. Photo / Michael Craig

It seemed apt given the effect she has had so far on what had been shaping up as a dull election, and on PM Bill English's hopes of a fourth term - not to mention the collateral damage to the Green Party.

Ardern did not say anything new in the way of policy. She did not need to. She could have sung Mary had a Little Lamb and they would have been happy.

Her speech was delivered well and touched all the requisites of a Labour speech - there was due homage to previous Labour Prime Ministers, a bit of vision, a bit of talk about the economy and the children. She zoned in on climate change and the environment - while Bill English was setting out plans to spend $10 billion on roads.

Labour leader Jacinda Arden is stopped for a selfie as she goes walkabout after delivering her speech at the Labour campaign launch in the Auckland Town Hall. Photo / Michael Craig
Labour leader Jacinda Arden is stopped for a selfie as she goes walkabout after delivering her speech at the Labour campaign launch in the Auckland Town Hall. Photo / Michael Craig

There was the ritual airing of the Norm Kirk quote that people needed "Someone to love, somewhere to live, somewhere to work and something to hope for."

That had also been used by the four leaders who went before her. The difference was that Ardern had delivered the hope to those at the launch.

As she walked out, Tim Finn's Couldn't Be Done played - reflecting how rapidly tables had turned.

Ardern is yet to set out Labour policy on issues such as income tax and capital gains tax. There will be other policy areas she will have to contend with.

To highlight National's perceived failings on areas such as the economy and homelessness, Ardern had used the refrain of "so now what?"

Former Prime Minister Helen Clark greets Jacinda Ardern at the party campaign launch. Photo / Getty Images
Former Prime Minister Helen Clark greets Jacinda Ardern at the party campaign launch. Photo / Getty Images

The campaign launch was aimed at inspiring the faithful (and some fickle) Labour troops. It worked a treat.

But for the next five weeks, Ardern will face the slightly more sceptical voters who will be asking the same question of her: "now what?"

More Jacinda Ardern fans get their picture taken with the Labour Party leader. Photo / Michael Craig
More Jacinda Ardern fans get their picture taken with the Labour Party leader. Photo / Michael Craig