There were plenty of shots fired at President-elect Donald Trump throughout the Golden Globes.

Host Jimmy Fallon set the tone immediately, wasting no time in roasting Trump like a plump turkey.

With his teleprompter failing Fallon was left to wing it in front of the star studded audience and the event's worldwide television audience.

Before the ceremony questions had been raised around the amiable Fallon's willingness to rock the boat with some political jibes. Especially after his fluffy interview with Trump last year which was widely criticised for its gentle tone.

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But Fallon set his sights on Trump right from the get go, welcoming people to the Golden Globes by saying it was, "one of the few places left where America still honours the popular vote".

It's a jibe that will no doubt rile the tetchy Trump who is known to be sensitive about, well, any criticism really, but especially comment that questions the legitimacy of his upcoming presidency.

After running through some of the big TV nominees, Fallon said of Game of Thrones, "many people have wondered what would have happened if King Joffrey had lived. In 12 days we'll find out."

Joffrey, of course, was a major villain of the series, a tyrannical child king, prone to tantrums with a cruel temper, cowardly nature and thin skin.

This image released by NBC shows host Jimmy Fallon at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017. (Paul Drinkwater/NBC via AP)
This image released by NBC shows host Jimmy Fallon at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017. (Paul Drinkwater/NBC via AP)

Moving onto movies Fallon then referenced the dramedy Florence Foster Jenkins, saying, "she's been called the world's worst opera singer and even she turned down performing at Trump's inauguration."

A direct reference to Trump's troubles securing A-list talent to perform at his inauguration party.

Fallon closed his monologue with a final impromptu dig reassuring the audience that there had been no interference in the voting.

"The votes were carefully tallied by the accounting firm of Ernst and Young and Putin."

An hour of uneventful award giving and accepting followed before Hugh Laurie broke the malaise with a scathingly humorous acceptance speech.

"I'll be able to say I won at the very last Golden Globes," he said to audible confusion in the room. Laurie rode the silence before saying, "I don't mean to be gloomy but it does have the words 'Hollywood', 'foreign' and 'press' in the title."

"To some republicans even the word 'association' is slightly sketchy."

As the music began playing, signalling it was time he got off the stage, Laurie continued, saying, "I accept this award in the name of psychotic billionaires everywhere."

Accepting the award for Best Animated feature Zootopia's trio of directors picked up the theme around forty minutes later, albeit in a more serious manner, saying that it was important to "embrace diversity when some people want to divide us by instilling fear," which is a theme of the movie.

Tom Hiddleston looked set to carry on the roast, beginning his acceptance speech by saying, "Wow this is lovely thank you. Just quickly to add to the things that Hugh Laurie begun...." before bypassing Laurie's political bent entirely and instead thanking agents, directors, producers and aid workers in Sudan.

Lifetime achievement award winner Meryl Streep dedicated her entire acceptance speech to attacking the divisive hate-based policies of Trump.

This image released by NBC shows Meryl Streep accepting the Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017.
This image released by NBC shows Meryl Streep accepting the Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017.

"What is Hollywood anyway?" she asked. "Just a bunch of people from different places."

She then ran through the birth places of the night's winners along with that of Hollywood's biggest stars, asking, "where are their birth certificates?".

"Hollywood is crawling with foreigners and outsiders and if you kick them all out you'll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts - which is not the arts."

Streep then described Trump's gross imitation of a disabled reporter at a political rally last year as heart breaking.

"I still can't get it out of my head because this wasn't a movie, this was real life."

As of writing Trump was yet to respond to any of the star's jibes, zings or jabs, although it's surely only a matter of time before he strikes back via his preferred method of communication, Twitter.