Rhys Darby

Comedian Rhys Darby on life in New Zealand

Rhys Darby: A monstrously ripping return of Godzilla plot

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The truth is out there - just ask the squid fishermen of Japan.

I find Godzilla exciting because he/she/it comes from the sea. It's entirely plausible that it could be real. Photo / Getty Images
I find Godzilla exciting because he/she/it comes from the sea. It's entirely plausible that it could be real. Photo / Getty Images

The new trailer for Godzilla is out and boy is it a beauty. I don't know what it is about Godzilla but as far as I'm concerned the more versions of it the better. This latest take on the Japanese icon will be the second American attempt. Some of you may recall the less-than-perfect 1998 version starring Matthew Broderick.

My memories of that film consist of a giant footprint, flying yellow cabs and monster babies. Hmmm, well anyway, despite the silliness that comes with it, the concept has remained the same - a giant behemoth smashing up a city.

Whether you take it as a metaphor for nuclear weapons, as conceived in Ishiro Honda's original 1954 film, or at face value, a terrorising beast, you can't deny it's overall awesomeness.

I find Godzilla exciting because he/she/it comes from the sea. It's entirely plausible that it could be real. Yes it is! It doesn't take a huge stretch in the imagination to imagine that something may be living at the deepest depths of one of our oceans.

In 1997, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration picked up a sound from deep beneath the Pacific. This sound, known as The Bloop, is thought to have been produced by an animal larger than anything we've ever seen.

The Bloop noise, which lasted just over a minute, was one of the most powerful noises ever recorded underwater, even picked up by sensors located 4828km away! The location, just to get you a bit more nervous, was 2414km west of the southern Chilean coast, that sweet spot in the South Pacific near one of my favourite places - Easter Island.

So coincidence? I think not. The 887 freaky moai monolithic figures made by the Rapa Nui people all of which at one point faced inland towards the villages may have been erected to protect and watch over the people.

From what though, I hear you ask. Well how about a gigantic sea beast? Only seven moai statues face the ocean. They're called the Ahu Akivi and as legend has it they are the seven men who wait for their king to arrive. Godzilla is known as the King of Monsters, so therein lies the link.

The people of Japan have seen an increase this year in the number of giant squid being caught along their coast. Several of these creatures, some of which measure up to 8m long, have been ensnared in nets.

A local fisherman caught one such giant off the coast of Sadogashima Island. He told a reporter from the Japan Times that in all of his 15 years of fishing, this was the first time he'd laid his eyes on such a biggie.

He wondered whether it might be some kind of omen ... and, by Jove, I think he's right. First the mega oarfish in California, now this.

What in Rapa Nui's name is lurking down there ... deep, deep down in our Pacific?

- NZ Herald

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