The country's richest people have been revealed in this year's Rich List - but for some living on struggle street, those folk may well be living on a whole other planet.

At McGehan Close in Auckland's Mt Albert, life is hard.

It was the street former Prime Minister John Key dubbed the nation's "street of hopelessness" when he visited a decade ago.

One resident, Angel, has lived there for 44 years and says it is made up of solo parents, young families, beneficiaries and pensioners.

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It was the street former Prime Minister John Key dubbed the nation's
It was the street former Prime Minister John Key dubbed the nation's "street of hopelessness" when he visited years ago. Photo / Vaimoana Tapaleao

Most of the street are not home - away either at work or appointments, she says.

Others just don't answer the door.

Holding the Rich List in her hands, there's a look of disbelief as she scans the piece of paper showing how much each rich lister is worth: $7.5 billion, $3.7b, $3.5b and so on.

"I dream about this.

"But why do this? [Show] who's the richest. Is that a stab in the back?"

Together, the top 10 wealthiest New Zealanders are worth more than $25 billion, this year's National Business Review Rich List shows.

Angel says it's not fair poorer people have to pay more tax; especially when many continue to look for a good job or were just getting by as it is.

It must be something else not to worry about bills and a budget to make sure the utilities and rent are paid and there's food in the house, she says.

"I want to see their side - rich people - come here and see what it's like to live.

"Come spend a week in my shoes and see what it's like to struggle."

At McGehan Close in Auckland's Mt Albert, life is hard. Photo / Vaimoana Tapaleao
At McGehan Close in Auckland's Mt Albert, life is hard. Photo / Vaimoana Tapaleao

Ten years ago, Key visited the street and spoke with residents. He later apologised for his comment that it was New Zealand's street of hopelessness.

Standing outside her house, Angel points towards the corner where Key stood all those years ago and where all the cameras were.

Nobody else "famous or political" had visited their street since, she says.

"I'd like to see some of that money come our way or to charity.

"We don't think about different societies like that - we're all the same. Come and be like one of us for a week and then you'll understand."