Twelve Questions

Sarah Daniell poses 12 questions to well-known faces

Twelve Questions with Owen Glenn

Owen Glenn. Photo / Paul Estcourt
Owen Glenn. Photo / Paul Estcourt

This month philanthropist and entrepreneur Owen Glenn became a 50 per cent shareholder in the Warriors, alongside Kiwi businessman Eric Watson. British-born Mr Glenn was raised in India, where he attended boarding school in the Himalayas, before his family moved to New Zealand when he was 11. Mr Glenn, 72, has six children. He is inspired by Gandhi and the art of passive resistance. He divides his time between Sydney and New Zealand.

What is the thing you are most envious of Eric Watson for.

His youth.

What's the best thing about being wealthy?

You don't have to bend over to pick up that 10c piece any longer.

Your most treasured possession?

Memories.

Most outrageous request received in a letter/email, asking you for money?

"Please send me Fiji dollars 10,000 my Auntie is sick."

I had never met Auntie but I sent the money regardless and then four weeks later I receive another email, "Auntie died and I need another Fiji dollars 100,000 for her wake, can you help?"

What do you owe your parents?

The foresight my parents had to bring me to New Zealand and their unconditional love.

What are you afraid of?

Dying alone.

You would most like to apologise to whom and for what?

A lady I stood up on a date 30 years ago, I still feel terrible about it.

What is your guiltiest pleasure?

Indian sweets as I am a diabetic type 2 sufferer.

If you weren't you, you'd most like to be?

Frank Sinatra! In my best New Joisey accent ... "De voice, de nights out with de broads and de guys plus I'd be singing My Way - what a time I'd have".

The thing you'd most like to change about yourself?

My hairstyle or lack of it. Plus I'd like to be younger because I've got so much I want to do.

The New Zealand economy could be fixed if only ... ?

We leased our country to the Swiss for five years. Just imagine it would be returned on time, clean, fiscally balanced, at peace and with a better work ethic and all using other people's money!

Your greatest investment remorse?

Like most entrepreneurs I have had my share of failed investments. I remember an investment in a restaurant, a modelling agency and a supermarket trolley collecting vehicle - each of which cost me a lot of money. I am older and wiser now.

- NZ Herald

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