You could say a sense of adventure is in Jack Pringle's blood.

The sixth-generation Whanganui Collegiate School student has been tramping, servicing and upskilling on his way to achieving the gold Duke of Edinburgh.

When he embarked on his Duke of Edinburgh journey, Pringle climbed Mt Ruapehu to receive bronze, not knowing the historical signficance of his climb.

His great-great-great-grandfather was Collegiate old boy Thomas Allison who was the first person to reach the summit of Ruapehu in 1877 along with his brother.

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"I didn't know that when I did it. I got told afterwards and it was amazing to know I had walked in his footsteps in a way," Pringle said.

"It's quite a weird feeling, but it's awesome to know that I've had ancestors that far back doing the same sorts of things that I have been doing."

Like his great-great-great grandfather before him, Pringle climbed Mt Ruapehu to claim his bronze award. Photo / Supplied
Like his great-great-great grandfather before him, Pringle climbed Mt Ruapehu to claim his bronze award. Photo / Supplied

The Duke Of Edinburgh's International Award has been offered in New Zealand since 1963 and is open to anyone aged 16 to 24 wanting a challenge.

The 18-year-old put his hand up to take it on after older students told him about what a great time they had doing it.

"It was amazing meeting different people all over the country," Pringle said.

"Tramping was probably my favourite part because you get out in the bush, everyone's tired and your true colors shine through."

Pringle is a keen rower and elected to help out with cleaning and boat checking at Aramoho-Wanganui Rowing Club for the award's service requirement.

For a skill, Pringle took on something a little bit different by choosing driving, but not just any driving.

"I did driving as my skill, getting my full licence and then driving different vehicles like diggers and tractors," he said.

"I knew a few people who had tractors I could learn on. I did a bit of that, got some experience and then started working on farms."

Pringle then stepped up to digger operation and ended up receiving his wheels, tracks and rollers licence, providing him with a good back-up for the future.

In his last year at school, Pringle plans to continue rowing when he leaves and is also doing Gateway work experience with Piping Hot Plumbing & Drainage.

He will receive his award from Governor-General Dame Patsy Reddy at a ceremony in Wellington later this year.