Kiwi Chris Liddell is a member of President Donald Trump's planned new strategic "swat team" set up to overhaul the federal bureaucracy.

The White House Office of American Innovation, to be lead by Jared Kushner, the President's son-in-law and senior adviser, will have sweeping authority to fulfil key campaign promises such as reforming care for veterans and fighting opioid addiction by harvesting ideas from the business world and, potentially, privatising some government functions.

Liddell, assistant to the president for strategic initiatives and former chief financial officer for a number of major corporations including General Motors, will join the office, which will operate as its own nimble power centre within the West Wing and report directly to Trump.

Viewed internally as a Swat team of strategic consultants, the office will be staffed by former business executives and is designed to infuse fresh thinking into Washington, float above the daily political grind and create a lasting legacy for a president still searching for signature achievements.

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Chris Liddell is a member of a new White Office office that aims to overhaul the federal bureaucracy. File photo / Andrew Warner
Chris Liddell is a member of a new White Office office that aims to overhaul the federal bureaucracy. File photo / Andrew Warner

"All Americans, regardless of their political views, can recognise that government stagnation has hindered our ability to properly function, often creating widespread congestion and leading to cost overruns and delays," Trump said to the Washington Post.

"I promised the American people I would produce results, and apply my 'ahead of schedule, under budget' mentality to the government."

In a White House riven at times by disorder and competing factions, the innovation office represents an expansion of Kushner's already far-reaching influence. The 36-year-old former real estate and media executive will continue to wear many hats, driving foreign and domestic policy as well as decisions on presidential personnel. He also is a shadow diplomat, serving as Trump's lead adviser on relations with China, Mexico, Canada and the Middle East.

The work of White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon has drawn considerable attention, especially after his call for the "deconstruction of the administrative state". But Bannon will have no formal role in the innovation office, which Trump advisers described as an incubator of sleek transformation as opposed to deconstruction.

The announcement of the new office comes at a humbling moment for the president, following Friday's collapse of his first major legislative push - an overhaul of the health-care system, which Trump had championed as a candidate.

Kushner is positioning the new office as "an offensive team" - an aggressive, non ideological ideas factory capable of attracting top talent from inside and outside of government, and serving as a conduit with the business, philanthropic and academic communities.

"We should have excellence in government," Kushner said on Sunday in an interview in his West Wing office. "The government should be run like a great American company. Our hope is that we can achieve successes and efficiencies for our customers, who are the citizens."

The innovation office has a particular focus on technology and data, and it is working with such titans as Apple chief executive Tim Cook, Microsoft founder Bill Gates, Salesforce chief executive Marc Benioff and Tesla founder and chief executive Elon Musk. The group has already hosted sessions with more than 100 such leaders and government officials.

"There is a need to figure out what policies are adding friction to the system without accompanying it with significant benefits," said Stephen A. Schwarzman, chief executive of the investment firm Blackstone Group. "It's easy for the private sector to at least see where the friction is, and to do that very quickly and succinctly."

Some of the executives involved have criticised some of Trump's policies, such as his travel ban, but said they are eager to help the administration address chronic problems.

"Obviously it has to be done with corresponding values and principles. We don't agree on everything," said Benioff, a Silicon Valley billionaire who raised money for Democrat Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign.

But, Benioff added, "I'm hopeful that Jared will be collaborative with our industry in moving this forward. When I talk to him, he does remind me of a lot of the young, scrappy entrepreneurs that I invest in in their 30s."

Kushner's ambitions for what the new office can achieve are grand. At least to start, the team plans to focus on reimagining Veterans Affairs, modernising the technology and data infrastructure of every federal department and agency, remodelling workforce-training programmes, and developing "transformative projects" under the banner of Trump's $1 trillion infrastructure plan, such as providing broadband internet service to every American.

In some cases, the office could direct that government functions be privatised, or that existing contracts be awarded to new bidders.

The office will also focus on combating opioid abuse, a regular emphasis for Trump on the campaign trail. The president this week plans to announce an official drug commission devoted to the problem, which will be chaired by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie. He has been working informally on the issue for several weeks with Kushner, despite reported tension between the two.

Under President Barack Obama, Trump advisers said scornfully, some business leaders privately dismissed their White House interactions as "Nato" meetings - "No action, talk only" - in which they were "lectured", without much follow-up.

Andrew Liveris, chairman and chief executive of Dow Chemical, who has had meetings with the two previous administrations, said the environment under Trump is markedly different.

After he left a recent meeting of manufacturing chief executives with Trump, Liveris said, "Rather than entering a vacuum, I'm getting emails from the president's team, if not every day, then every other day - 'Here's what we're working on'. 'We need another meeting'. 'Can you get us more input on this?'"

Kushner proudly notes that most of the members of his team have little-to-no political experience, hailing instead from the world of business. They include Gary Cohn, director of the National Economic Council; Chris Liddell, assistant to the president for strategic initiatives; Reed Cordish, assistant to the president for intergovernmental and technology initiatives; Dina Powell, senior counsellor to the president for economic initiatives and deputy national security adviser; and Andrew Bremberg, director of the Domestic Policy Council.

Ivanka Trump, the president's elder daughter and Kushner's wife, who now does her advocacy work from a West Wing office, will collaborate with the innovation office on issues such as workforce development but will not have an official role, aides said.
Powell, a former Goldman Sachs executive who spent a decade at the firm managing public-private job creation programmes, also boasts a government pedigree as a veteran of George W. Bush's White House and State Department. Bremberg also worked in the Bush administration. But others are political neophytes.

Liddell, who speaks with an accent from his native New Zealand, served as chief financial officer for General Motors, Microsoft and International Paper, as well as in Hollywood for William Morris Endeavor.

"We are part of the White House team, connected with everyone here, but we are not subject to the day-to-day issues, so we can take a more strategic approach to projects," Liddell said.

Like Kushner, Cordish is the scion of a real estate family - a Baltimore-based conglomerate known for developing casinos and shopping malls. And Cohn, a Democrat who has recently amassed significant clout in the White House, is the hard-charging former president of Goldman Sachs.

Trump's White House is closely scrutinised for its always-evolving power matrix, and the innovation office represents a victory for Wall Street figures such as Cohn who have sought to moderate Trump's agenda and project a friendly front to businesses, sometimes in conflict with the more hard-line conservatism championed by Bannon and Chief of Staff Reince Priebus.The innovation group has been meeting twice a week in Kushner's office, just a few feet from the Oval Office, largely barren but for a black-and-white photo of his paternal grandparents - Holocaust survivors - and a marked-up whiteboard more typical of tech start-ups. Kushner takes projects and decisions directly to the president for sign-off, though Trump also directly suggests areas of personal interest.

There could be friction as the group interacts with myriad federal agencies, though the advisers said they did not see themselves as an imperious force dictating changes but rather as a "service organisation" offering solutions.

Kushner's team is being formalised just as the Trump administration is proposing sweeping budget cuts across many departments, and members said they would help find efficiencies.

"The president's doing what is necessary to have a prudent budget, and that makes an office like this even more vital as we need to get more out of less dollars by doing things smarter, doing things better, and by leaning on the private sector," Cordish said.

Ginni Rometty, the chairman and chief executive of IBM, said she is encouraged: "Jared is reaching out and listening to leaders from across the business community - not just on day-to-day issues, but on long-term challenges like how to train a modern workforce and how to apply the latest innovations to government operations."

Trump sees the innovation office as a way to institutionalise what he sometimes did in business, such as helping New York City's government renovate the floundering Wollman Rink in Central Park, said Hope Hicks, the president's longtime spokeswoman.

"He recognised where the government has struggled with certain projects and he was someone in the private sector who was able to come in and bring the resources and creativity needed and ultimately execute in an efficient, cost-effective, way," Hicks said.

"In some respects, this is an extension of some of the highlights of the president's career."