Tech Universe: Thursday 21 June

By Miraz Jordan

In Britain, some bank customers can use their smartphones to withdraw up to £100 from an ATM via a password protected app. Photo / Thinkstock
In Britain, some bank customers can use their smartphones to withdraw up to £100 from an ATM via a password protected app. Photo / Thinkstock

APP POS: Some British bank customers can withdraw money from an ATM without their EFTPOS card. Instead they request up to £100 via a password protected app on their smartphone which returns a 6 digit number to tap in to the ATM. The digits on the phone are hidden until the user taps on them as a means to foil shoulder surfers. Great, lets get rid of all those plastic cards! BBC explains.

SEEING PINK: O2Amps are rose-coloured glasses from 2AI Labs that amplify the almost imperceptible signals of oxygen flow beneath the skin. The lenses highlight veins, for example, which could be very useful in hospitals. Spotting changes in bloodflow though could also be useful for casino staff, or for security staff. Now there's a market for makeup to foil such glasses. Changizi has further information.

SHOW SOME LEG: Today's prosthetic legs are far from the peg legs of yore, but they're still not always specially beautiful.

Bespoke Fairings are 3D printed covers that use a durable, lightweight polymer and allow clients to customise their own prosthetics. Fairings can also be enhanced with patterns, graphics, and materials so each person can have a really customised prosthetic. If you've got it, show it off. Bespoke details.

FLY FLY: The FlyNano personal seaplane has had a successful first flight. The single seater electric seaplane can fly up to 3,000 metres high but is better close to the ground or water. Cruising speed is around 140 Kph. I wonder if it would fit on a personal yacht? FlyNano has more. Check out the video here.

PUFFER JACKET: Klymit's Ulaar jacket aims to keep you at exactly the right comfortable temperature, even out in the elements. The jacket's a loose-fitting shell, but add argon gas and it insulates the wearer from the cold. The wearer uses a small cartridge of argon gas to inflate and deflate the jacket. Every 1 mm of argon has the same insulation properties as 3 mm of fabric. Inflating the jacket also makes it a tighter fit so body heat is retained. Since argon's an asphyxiant you may want to make sure you deflate the jacket outdoors. GadgetWiki elaborates. Here's the video.

Miraz Jordan, knowit.co.nz

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