Secretly in love with a co-worker? Find out if they love you back

By Harry Pettit for MailOnline

The dating service uses the popular office chat room Slack to reveal crushes. Photo / 123RF
The dating service uses the popular office chat room Slack to reveal crushes. Photo / 123RF

The matchmaking company Feeld has created a new feature to help people hookup with their office crush.

The dating experts now let colleagues connect using Slack, a chatroom app used by many tech and media companies.

Using a Slack bot created by Feeld, you can now type in your office crush's name, and if your lover-to-be types your name back, it will tell you there's a match, reported the Daily Mail.

Feeld advises users of the bizarre bot to "be nice/don't be a D" and all will be fine.

Washington Post journalist Mike Madden was left surprised when his team were sent Slack messages via the dating bot.

"Sorry, Slack, this is flattering and all, but I'm married," he tweeted.

"Also, is the whole point of that app to terrify HR people?"

It appears the dating service is not a cooperative effort between Feeld and Slack.

Slack is yet to officially endorse the strange integration with Feeld or offer any comment on it.

Slack is explicitly a workplace app, with the tagline on its website reading "Where work* happens."

The asterisk adds: *"Whatever work means for you, Slack brings all the pieces and people you need together so you can actually get things done."

Experts suggest that Feeld's dating service is simply piggybacking on the chatroom app.

And Feeld has a dark past. Originally marketed as "3nder", the app was touted as the "Tinder for threesomes" when it was first released in 2014.

According to its website at the time, 3nder, pronounced "threen-der", was geared towards "all swingers, newbies, curious and experienced" who are "discriminated by society the same way gay people were 15 years ago".

Developed by London-based entrepreneur Dimo Trifonov, 3nder let you sign up as a single person looking to match with a couple, or as a couple seeking a third person.

Like other dating websites, it let users set up a personal profile, where they could list details about themselves and what kind of relationship they were seeking.

Users could select a setting to keep their identity hidden from friends and family so they could "browse freely" on the app's database of potential partners.

The goal, the company said, was to expand people's views on sexuality and relationships. "We need to evolve our social acceptance," the website said.

FEELD'S DARK PAST

The Feeld app has a dark past. Originally marketed as "3nder", the app was touted as the "Tinder for threesomes" when it was first released in 2014.

According to its website, 3nder, pronounced "threen-der", was geared towards "all swingers, newbies, curious and experienced" who are "discriminated by society the same way gay people were 15 years ago".

The app, which bore the tagline: "Threesomes made easy," didn't work out, and now the company has re-branded and focused its attention on love in the office.

- Daily Mail

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