Men with deep voices sexier, but more likely to cheat - study

Women are more attracted to the deep sounds of Barry White.
Women are more attracted to the deep sounds of Barry White.

Barry White's seductive deep tones score over David Beckham's squeaky speech when it comes to sexual conquest, a study has shown.

Scientists found that men with masculine, low-pitched voices are better at attracting women - at least those looking for short-term flings.

But the baritone bad boys were also seen as more likely to cheat and not viewed as marriage material.

The study, published online in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, provides insights into the evolution of the human voice and mate selection.

"The sound of someone's voice can affect how we think of them," said Dr Jillian O'Connor, from McMaster University in Canada.

"Until now, it's been unclear why women would like the voices of men who might cheat. But we found that the more women thought these men would cheat, the more they were attracted to them for a brief relationship when they are less worried about fidelity."

For the study, 87 women listened to men's voices that were manipulated to sound higher or lower, and then chose who they thought was more likely to cheat.

Participants were also asked to pick the voice they found more attractive for long or short relationships.

"From an evolutionary perspective, these perceptions of future sexual infidelity may be adaptive," said Dr David Feinberg, from the department of psychology, neuroscience and behaviour at McMaster University.

"The consequences of infidelity are very high, whether it is emotional or financial, and this research suggests that humans have evolved as a protection mechanism to avoid long-term partners who may cheat."

U.S. researchers found the change in tonality was particularly apparent on the phone and that both men and women tried to match or mimic their partner or love interest's voice.

According to the study, women will use a lower pitch, while men will employ a higher one when speaking to their romantic partner.

The psychologist who led the study believes the change in people's voice variations when they are talking to friends versus lovers, could be used to detect infidelity too.

The study, published in the Journal of Nonverbal Behaviour, looked at how individuals alter their voices, or engage in voice modulation, when speaking to romantic partners versus same-sex friends during brief telephone conversations

Women will use a lower pitch, while men will employ a higher one when speaking to their romantic partner

- DAILY MAIL

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