The Scandinavian trend, or Scandi as it's better known, has ruled interior design for the last several years.

The clean lines, minimalism and open white spaces made Scandi an easy and popular interior design to adapt.

But it looks like the obsession with light wood furnishings and white on white on white may be coming to an end, as interior design in 2018 is pinned to adopt a much darker, moodier look.

Dark and moody shades are set to be popular in 2018.
Dark and moody shades are set to be popular in 2018.

We spoke to interior designer Sonya Cotter about the trend and to find out if we could finally say goodbye to the Scandi and IKEA furniture once and for all.

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Sonya, a professional member of the New Zealand Institute of Design, says darker colours are certainly making their way into our homes and the appeal lies in the way deep tones can help bring rooms together.

"It's interesting that we are using darker and darker colours in our homes. White reflects light around and opens up the space, but darker colours have a way of bringing the space together and creating more of a space."

Sonya identifies that Scandi became popular when Pinterest was launched.

"It was absolutely populated at the time Pinterest started. It just went crazy.

We could be seeing the end of the popular Scandi colors.
We could be seeing the end of the popular Scandi colors.

"The reason why Scandi works is that it's a beautiful, clean, fresh, minimalistic, simplistic trend, but we are getting a little over being so austere."

While you may be of the opinion that dark colours make spaces smaller, Sonya is quick to disagree and says in fact they can be perfectly suited to smaller homes, helping make them feel warm and cosy.

Sonya also notes that when it comes to interiors, people are becoming more sophisticated, increasingly aware of how to make decor choices based on what works for them and their homes and not just following the latest trends or fad.

"I think we are sort of becoming more educated about designing for ourselves, designing for our own environment and not necessarily designing from magazines or the Pinterest page."