The last thing on the mind of Cyndi Lauper on her opening night should be Donald Trump.

The musical dynamo, known for her exquisite voice and refreshingly eccentric style, was the special guest at the star-studded Australian premiere of her musical, Kinky Boots in Melbourne.

Cyndi Lauper, portrait, Hawaii, October 1986.Photo / Getty
Cyndi Lauper, portrait, Hawaii, October 1986.Photo / Getty

Having been on the road for what seems likes years, she is determined to get back to the US sooner than later.

"No, no I have to get home soon as I can't miss the election because you don't want to wake up in a nightmare." Ms Lauper told me.

Advertisement

"Let's just call it the history of wrong guys. Right? Chapter one, he's a bum."

(L-R) Shabba Ranks, Donald Trump, Unidentifed, Cyndi Lauper, Unidentified and Marla Maples pose for a photo at a Grammy Awards party at the Plaza Hotel in February 1992. Photo / Getty
(L-R) Shabba Ranks, Donald Trump, Unidentifed, Cyndi Lauper, Unidentified and Marla Maples pose for a photo at a Grammy Awards party at the Plaza Hotel in February 1992. Photo / Getty

Ironically, the words are just about spot-on to the lyrics in Kinky Boots, the show in which she wrote all the music and lyrics.

"He's a reality star,' 'adds Ms Lauper. "You shouldn't have a reality star becoming the potential anything unless you went to school and studied and had some actually factual information.

 Cyndi Lauper met Trump while filming a season of the TV show Celebrity Apprentice on NBC. Photo / Getty
Cyndi Lauper met Trump while filming a season of the TV show Celebrity Apprentice on NBC. Photo / Getty

"Strangely, this is why a show like this gives you hope and we all need some hope."

As we caught up for a good half-hour after the show - which received a mighty standing ovation and continues to be an international hit - Ms Lauper was blunt.

"There is a lot of freakin' talent here and I'm tired of seeing them all having to go to LA or to New York or to London," adds a passionate Ms Lauper.

Cyndi Lauper, U.S. singer-songwriter, singing into a microphone, silver make-up on her lips and eyelids, at the Montreux Rock Festival, in Montreux, Switzerland, May 1984. Photo / Getty
Cyndi Lauper, U.S. singer-songwriter, singing into a microphone, silver make-up on her lips and eyelids, at the Montreux Rock Festival, in Montreux, Switzerland, May 1984. Photo / Getty

"If you could just build some more theatres and make a 'theatre row'.

You build restaurants around them and people will come to Melbourne and see theatre. It's not rocket science!

Cyndi Lauper performs in New York City. Photo / Getty
Cyndi Lauper performs in New York City. Photo / Getty

"And you're talent wouldn't need to leave because they'd have a place to develop, so you can develop your damn talent and bring it around the world. You definitely have the talent and the people."

Cyndi, who rose to prominence with Girls Just Wanna Have Fun and True Colors, has been coming to Australia since the 80s and still loves it.

"Except when I had my son Declan 18 years, I didn't come for awhile, but I still love it, but boy, dammit, you have to nurture your talent."

As for the show, Cyndi underplays her role in its mega-successs: "I'm just a little cog in the wheel but the whole cast are just great" sais Ms Lauper. "They were all just so 'in' the moment."

The Kinky Boots book was written by Harvey Fiersten and Cyndi was thrilled when asked to write the lyrics and music for the show: "I love, love the show and never get tired of watching it."

Todrick Hall poses with
Todrick Hall poses with "The Angels" backstage at the hit musical Kinky Boots on Broadway at The Al Hirshfeld Theatre on March 23, 2016 in New York City. Photo / Getty

The feel-good, Tony, Grammy and Olivier-award winning Kinky Boots had an Oz opening night that attracted a huge guest list to Her Majesty's Theatre in Melbourne, Saturday night.

Artists, fashionistas, stars of the stage and screen and drag queens mixed it up with Australian captains of industry, politicians and Melbourne establishment for one of most fun nights of the theatrical year.

Cyndi Lauper attends the 11th Annual Rosie's Theater Kids Benefit Gala at the New York Marriott Marquis on September 22, 2014 in New York City. Photo / Getty
Cyndi Lauper attends the 11th Annual Rosie's Theater Kids Benefit Gala at the New York Marriott Marquis on September 22, 2014 in New York City. Photo / Getty

Opening night guests included theatrical producer Michael Cassel, PR doyenne Deeta Colvin, Natalie Bassingthwaighte, Josh Thomas, Lawrence Mooney, Melbourne Storm Coach Craig Bellamy, theatrical producer Lisa Campbell, Twitter Australia CEO Karen Stocks, NGV Director Tony Elwood and Melbourne fashion identities Jacquie Fishman from Miss Louise, Christine Dunbar from 'Christine' and pyjama king Peter Alexander.

There was Lyndi and Rodney Aler, philanthropists John Gandel, beyondblue CEO Georgie Harman and Chairman Jeff Kennett, Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews with his wife Catherine Andrews as well as Qantas CEO Alan Joyce, Rebekah Elmaloglou, Jo Litson, Graeme Lewsey and Shiva Singham of Melbourne Fashion Festival renown, TV's Melissa Doyle, the ABC's Paul Kennedy, Michael Rowland and Virginia Trioli, the Australian Ballet's David McAllister, Ash Pollard from Dancing With The Stars and Real Housewives of Melbourne, Pettifleur Berenger & Gamble Breaux. Diverse guest list?

(L-R) Singer Sara Ramirez, singer/True Colors Fund co-founder Cyndi Lauper, and TV personality Carson Kressley. Photo / Getty
(L-R) Singer Sara Ramirez, singer/True Colors Fund co-founder Cyndi Lauper, and TV personality Carson Kressley. Photo / Getty

Indeed. Just as diverse as the terrific show.

The Hoyer Verdict

The entire show is just good, theatrical fun. There is pathos, there is love, readjusting of prejudices, lots of smiles, some tears, dynamic staging and fabulous costuming.

The plot revolves around a young man (Charlie Price, played by the fantastic Toby Francis) who is left to run an old-school, family shoe factory in Nothern England.

Charlie needs to make dramatic changes to his 'shoes' if the factory is to survive. Enter the whole idea of creating 'kinky' boots, spurred on by drag queen Lola (played brilliantly by Callum Francis).

Working together, their 'boots' finally make it to the runways of Milan. Yes. I loved the entire show. So, in those inimitable words of Mr Ian Meldrum: 'do yourself a favour'.