Glastonbury: Masses move like Jagger

Festival goers participate in a flash mob where the participants dance like Rolling Stones singer Mick Jagger at the Glastonbury Music Festival. Photo / AP
Festival goers participate in a flash mob where the participants dance like Rolling Stones singer Mick Jagger at the Glastonbury Music Festival. Photo / AP

Hundreds of festival-goers proved they had the moves like Jagger by taking part in a Jumping Jack Flashmob at Glastonbury.

The Jagger Off, arranged by two Rolling Stones fans to celebrate the band's first appearance at the festival, saw crowds of people mimic Sir Mick Jagger's trademark dance moves.

It was held near the Pyramid Stage, where the band will perform their headline set on Saturday night, under the watchful eye of a giant metal phoenix that is perching on top of the structure this year.

A sound system played classic Stones songs including Brown Sugar and Start It Up to about 400 fans.

Organiser James Duke-Evans, 33, from south London, said: "It's gone fantastically well.

"When it got dreamed up late at night we thought it would be funny if 100 people turned up, but 3500 joined the Facebook group in the end.

"People like to get involved in something that's not scripted and programmed. I've been told some people were looking forward to this more than the festival itself."

Sir Mick is expected to be on the festival site over the weekend, and is staying nearby with his family.

There is a chance he might even stumble upon the second Jagger Off, at the silent disco held in the early hours of Saturday morning.

Many of those performing the moves, which including the "finger waggle" and "squeezing through a narrow doorway", wore Jagger masks as a tribute to their musical hero.

Some 135,000 ticket holders have been making their way on to the site at Worthy Farm, Somerset, since the festival flung open its doors yesterday morning.

Campsites have been filling up quickly as music fans rushed to pitch their tents in the best spots.

The main acts play from Friday, with other headline acts including The Arctic Monkeys and Mumford & Sons.

On Thursday night the Dalai Lama's Tibetan monks brought an oasis of calm to the festival chaos with a chanting session.

The Gyuto Monks, who live in exile in north India, performed chants at the Toad Hall venue in the festival's Green Fields area to mark the 100th anniversary of the Tibetan declaration of independence.

Lobsang Yeshe, chant master, said: "We're representing all of the Gyuto monks living in exile.

"We are sure they would all like to come and perform in front of all these people, but we are the lucky ones to be in this amazing place."

The monks were impressed by their first experience of Glastonbury.

Group member Nawang Namdol said: "It has the same kind of high-octane spiritual energy you get from being in the presence of his holiness the Dalai Lama. There is a good energy here."

- PAA

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