Stick to reputable sites for All Black jerseys, says Consumer NZ

By Paul Harper

All Blacks captain Richie McCaw leading the charge against the Springboks during last week's test against South Africa. It was the first showing of the new All Blacks jersey. Photo / Mark Mitchell
All Blacks captain Richie McCaw leading the charge against the Springboks during last week's test against South Africa. It was the first showing of the new All Blacks jersey. Photo / Mark Mitchell

If you're after the new Rugby World Cup All Black jersey, buy it from a reputable overseas website, Consumer NZ recommends.

The Rugby World Cup edition of this year's jersey costs $220 in most New Zealand retail outlets but the same jersey can be picked up for under $105 online in the United States.

The price difference has angered fans, who have accused adidas of price gouging, and also some retailers in New Zealand.

Consumer chief executive Sue Chetwin recommended people have a look at overseas websites for the jerseys.

"In terms of people buying them overseas they just need to be careful they are getting them from a reputable site and watch that they won't have any CGA (Consumer Guarantee Act) rights if they brought them in from overseas.

Chetwin said even with 10 per cent duty charged to clothes purchased overseas, it would be worthwhile buying the jerseys from the United States.

"You can still bring in two before you would attract any more fees that were going to make it more expensive than actually buying it here, so it is well worth having a go."

She said adidas was entitled to charge whatever they like, but did believe the price difference was "a bit on the nose".

"[Cup organisers have] been saying that New Zealanders shouldn't be trying to be creaming it while the Rugby world Cup is on, they've been admonishing people running accommodation not to hike their prices too high and here's a major sponsor supplier of the tops, there is going to be a huge sale of [team jerseys] to people who want to support the game and wear the same clothes, and they have certainly got a premium on those.

"They can have a small premium, but to be paying nearly double for what you might be able to get it overseas seems to be profiteering."

Chetwin did not buy reason given by adidas New Zealand's country manager David Huggett for the price difference. Yesterday Huggett said "the price we set in New Zealand is relative to the local market and the price they pay overseas is largely driven against currency fluctuation which has changed quite significantly over the last couple of years".

"I think that deserves a gobbledygook award," Chetwin said.

"Given that they've probably been made overseas, are being imported into New Zealand and the New Zealand dollar has never been higher ... I just don't get that."


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