More than 30,000 people have been to see the works of Banksy in Auckland and the exhibition has proved so popular opening hours are being extended.

The Aotea Centre will be open from 10am to 10pm on February 2 and 3 before closing for good on February 6.

People who have pre-purchased tickets were urged to redeem them as soon as possible to avoid missing out as daily numbers are strictly limited.

Some of the 80 featured works will never be seen again, including one massive piece of street art featuring street kids in LA erecting a flag on a burned out car, a parody of the famous Battle of Iwo Jima photograph featuring American soldiers in Japan.

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Producer Stewart Macpherson said an extraordinary number of people have visited the exhibition this summer, making it one of the most successful art exhibitions New Zealand has ever hosted.

"We don't want anyone missing out," he said.

Exhibition organiser Steve Swift puts the final touches to the Art of Banksy exhibition at the Aotea Centre, Auckland. Photo / Michael Craig.
Exhibition organiser Steve Swift puts the final touches to the Art of Banksy exhibition at the Aotea Centre, Auckland. Photo / Michael Craig.

"People will be able to come after work on those days plus it's the weekend before Waitangi Day. Just saying, make it a long long weekend and visit Auckland and the exhibition."

Part of the reason Macpherson thought the exhibition had been so successful was because Banksy's messaging resonated with New Zealanders' strong social conscience.

"As Kiwis, we're not afraid to stick it to the establishment. To stand up for social justice. Make statements on global issues. Be a big voice in a small body. To me, Banksy encapsulates everything we stand for."

The exhibition, curated by the artist's former manager Steve Lazarides, displays the largest collection of Banksy's works, including the famous painting of the girl with the red balloon, known as Girl and Balloon, the controversial work Laugh Now – a famous graffiti piece that depicts a monkey with a sign hanging from his neck with the words: "Laugh now, but one day we'll be in charge."

On loan from private collectors from throughout the world, the collection is worth $40 million.

Tickets are on sale today via Ticketmaster. A booking fee applies.