World Water Week kicks off this week

By Solbin Kang

Foure Moussa travels the 2km to the nearest borehole at night to avoid long queues. Photo / Unicef
Foure Moussa travels the 2km to the nearest borehole at night to avoid long queues. Photo / Unicef

World Water Week kicks off this week as global leaders and experts discuss water issues around the world.

This year's World Water Week, held in Stockholm, Sweden, will focus on water and sustainable growth.

The campaign states 1.8 billion people are without safe water.

Photographer Ashley Gilbertson captured these photographs of families in developing

The Malenga family, in Malawi, uses 120 litres of water each day and say their community's health has improved since moving from a shallow well to a bore. Photo / Unicef
The Malenga family, in Malawi, uses 120 litres of water each day and say their community's health has improved since moving from a shallow well to a bore. Photo / Unicef

countries and their daily water use last year.

Fouré Moussa, who lives in Niger, collects the 80 litres of water her family uses daily from a borehole 2km from her home.

To avoid long queues at the water source, she goes at night.

The walk takes 30 minutes each way, and once there, it takes 15 minutes to fill a container.

René Visalla (third from left) and his family, indigenous Guaraní living in Bolivia, use 140 litres of water a day.

Rene Visalla (third from left) says running water and a toilet have made life much safer for his  family as they often encountered snakes while relieving themselves in the bush. Photo / Unicef
Rene Visalla (third from left) says running water and a toilet have made life much safer for his family as they often encountered snakes while relieving themselves in the bush. Photo / Unicef

He said running water and a toilet have brought his family safety, including from snakes in the bushes, where they once relieved themselves.

In Malawi, the Malenga family uses 120 litres of water each day.

"We used to draw water from a shallow well. It wasn't clean like the borehole we draw from now. We got diarrhoea, and some members of the community got cholera," Malenga said.

The Syrian Abu Noqta family, who are living in Jordan's Zaatari   refugee camp, need 380 litres of water daily, including to stay cool amid brutal temperatures. Photo / Unicef
The Syrian Abu Noqta family, who are living in Jordan's Zaatari refugee camp, need 380 litres of water daily, including to stay cool amid brutal temperatures. Photo / Unicef

The Esteban family lives in District 7, one of the poorest neighbourhoods in the Bolivian city of El Alto.

The family use 100 litres of water daily.

"The most important thing in my life and my home is water. Without it we don't have life," Esteban said.

- NZ Herald

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