Up to 30 per cent of bank customers place a low value on brand loyalty and many would be happy to open a bank account with Google or Amazon if they could, research has revealed.

A survey by digital strategy consultants Accenture has revealed a new type of bank customer - the nomad. They are digitally savvy, adventurous and keen to shop around.

Steve Willis, Accenture Financial Services managing director for New Zealand and Australia, said the research found the group was spread across all age groups, not just centred on tech-savvy millennials.

While 43 per cent of nomads were under 35, 37 per cent were between 35 and 50 and 12 per cent were more than 50.

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The age-group spread is important as banking customers typically get wealthier as they get older and take up more services.

Willis said the nomad group was adventurous with their banking, with three-quarters happy to set up an account with an online bank themselves and 77 per cent keen to open an account with Amazon, Google or other non-traditional online provider if they could.

"Which is a bit scary for banks because they are data rich and data capable."

More than half of nomads want to be able to make payments with their smartphone and access personal budgeting services and the same number want instant face-to-face banking advice on their phone.

But Willis said some nomads also wanted banks to go beyond what they were prepared to support with 45 per cent keen to have direct access to digital money forms like Bitcoin.

Willis said the expectations of consumers were flowing between industries.

"One thing I think the banks do need to think about is properly understanding the expectations of consumers; what they value and the experience they want."

Willis said nomads did not value loyalty very highly and instead valued convenience and collaboration.

As a result banks should reduce the difficulties of switching and give them freedom to roam.

The research also found nomads wanted to get involved in developing new products and services with nearly 40 per cent keen to see their bank create social media groups to help do that.