Five steps to make someone fall in love with you

Listening, smiling and maintaining eye contact are all things that lead to a long-term connection. Photo/Getty
Listening, smiling and maintaining eye contact are all things that lead to a long-term connection. Photo/Getty

A scientist says making someone fall in love with you is as easy as five simple steps.

Psychotherapist and author M. Gary Neuman told Business Insider that the steps are all about encouraging attractiveness and inspiring feelings that could lead to a long-term connection.

Check out his top tips below:

1. Keep eye contact

It's scientifically proven that intimacy increases between people who don't look away as much and keep a more constant eye contact.

According to a study by American social psychologist, lawyer, and author Zick Rubin, people who are in love maintain eye contact 75 pr cent of the time.

2. Be a good listener

If you want someone to fall for you, avoid digressing and turning a conversation back to you.

Neuman cites studies by the University of Nevada and the University of Washington, which found that listening is a vital component to falling in love.

Wanting to be heard is a deep-seated primal need, so it's important to engage in conversation, and ask follow up questions.

To create a strong bond with someone, avoid turning the conversation back to you. Photo / Getty
To create a strong bond with someone, avoid turning the conversation back to you. Photo / Getty

3. Validation

Making someone feel supported is a key part to falling in love.

Neuman says a person is more likely to love you if they feel as though they are getting it right. He claims 48 per cent of failed relationships are due to one or both partners feeling a lack of appreciation.

4. Smiling

This sounds basic, but according to a study by Drake University, smiling makes you more attractive and engaging, and overall more appealing to others.

5. Touching

According to Harvard University, touching leads to greater overall satisfaction in relationships, and increases levels of comfort and intimacy.

Neuman says being tactile with someone (but not in a creepy way), helps to strengthen bonds between people.

-nzherald.co.nz

- news.com.au

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