Jonathan Saunders wanted simple runway hair

Jonathan Saunders changed his models' hair just hours before his Autumn/Winter 12 show.

The Scottish designer showcased at London Fashion Week on Sunday and was determined that everything be perfect. He was worried the original look didn't play up to the clothes enough, so hairstylist Paul Hanlon created something new.

"The look we'd created at the fitting was covering the clothes a little," Paul told style.com.

"So we had to rethink the whole thing, really simplify it and create a style free of references that wouldn't distract from the clothes."

In the end they settled on a sleek ponytail. It's a look Saunders has used before but remains one of his favourites and it's also something Hanlon thinks works well with the designer's kind of clothes.

"We love a ponytail at Jonathan Saunders. I've done quite a few [here]," he laughed.

"Jonathan was inspired by the Japanese in part, their attention to detail. That sense of discipline and order is present in the [hair]-it's as tight as the models could stand it."

He used hairspray to ensure there were no free strands and mousse to help give grip. Surprisingly, the hairstylist then used twine to secure the look in place.

"I was thinking of the way horses' tails are bound for dressage," he explained.

"By binding the top of the ponytail, you can make it protrude an inch or so from the head, creating a stronger shape in the profile."

The clothes themselves were short and well-cut - shorts paired with over-sized blazers and dresses boasting fitted bodices and flared skirts. Saunders revealed he wanted his latest line to show the ways he has grown as a designer.

"I thought that it was interesting to look at a more tailored structured silhouette, maybe lengths were a little shorter. She meant business, much more of a strong approach. It felt like a natural progression," he explained to guardian.co.uk.

"I always start with colour so red was a natural colour to signify that. I was thinking about a kind of Japanese idea in which a structure was important but the palette was quite feminine."

- AAP

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