Sunday DIY: For all seasons

By Greig Morgan

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Grieg Morgan's shelter keeps the barbecue piping hot, whatever the weather

Create a cover for your barbie and you can cook outdoors to your heart's content all year round. Photo / Michael Craig
Create a cover for your barbie and you can cook outdoors to your heart's content all year round. Photo / Michael Craig

Meat tastes so much better when it's been cooked on a barbecue, and I don't want the weather to dictate when I can cook outside.

To avoid that fate, I made this framing and polycarbonate roofing shelter. I built it on the ground and it was light enough to lift into place. It was pretty simple to install a couple of posts (parallel to the garden shed) and fix them to the fascia board under the guttering, making the shelter high enough to not need a flashing.


Step 1 - Determine the placement of the posts parallel with the shed; mine were about 1.2m out, with a spacing of 1.6m.

Step 2 - Fix a stake at either end of the chosen location, then tie a string line between them.

Step 3 - Dig post holes 250 to 300mm wide by 600mm deep, then install the posts to the string line using quick-set concrete (for best results, follow the instructions on the bag). Check with a level to make sure they're plumb and aligned with the string.

Step 4 - On the shed, mark the height from the bottom of the framing, then using a level, mark across to your posts. Now measure 60 to 100mm down on the posts. This will give you the angle, using a bevel to gauge the roof angle for sufficient water run-off.

Step 5 - Measure 100mm down on the posts to allow for the 100 x 75mm beam. Cut the posts off level, then measure and cut your 100 x 75mm beam to length, allowing about 200mm overhang at either end.

Step 6 - Glue the top of the posts before fixing down the beam with screws.

Step 7 - With the angle set on your bevel, transfer it to the two outer ends of the 100 x 50mm framing and cut along the waste side of the line. Now measure and mark with the bevel the opposite way, and cut these angles on a 45 degree mitre.

Step 8 - Measure and cut a piece of 100 x 50mm framing to length for your ledger. Fix the two outer ends to the ledger with screws, then cut the outer framing on the correct bevel and 45-degree angle to suit, and fix with screws.

Step 9 - With the centre piece of framing cut to the correct angles, fit and screw it into place.

Step 10 - With the frame now assembled, check it's square by measuring from corner to corner and adjusting accordingly.

Step 11 - Cut 50 x 25mm battens flush with the outer frame. Fix one to the ledger and one on the opposite end, then space the others evenly across the frame. These are for the roof fixings.

Step 12 - Measure, mark and use an angle grinder to cut the polycarbonate roofing to length, with about 50mm overhang from the front of the frame.

Step 13 - Place the roofing flush with an outside edge of framing, then overlap the next sheet. Pre-drill 10mm holes to allow for expansion on every second to third crest (the upper part of the roofing).

Step 14 - Have someone help you to lift the finished frame on to the beam. Slide it into place against the shed under the guttering, and fix it to the pre-drilled holes. For added strength, insert coach screws into the shed framing.


Materials
• 100 x 100mm H5 treated dress gauge posts x 2
• 100 x 75mm H5 dress gauge post x 1 (beam)
• 100 x 50mm H 3.2 dress gauge (framing)
• 50 x 25mm H3 dress gauge (roof battens)
• Polycarbonate roofing with roofing screws
• 60mm galvanised screws
• 100mm coach screws
• Exterior glue
• Quick-set concrete
• Stain or paint

Tools
• Spade
• Level
• Skill saw
• Hammer
• String line
• Tape measure
• Bevel
• Builder's square
• Screw gun
• Angle grinder
• Drill bits

- Herald on Sunday

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