New Zealand's booming IT industry is giving workers the opportunity to job-hob, with more than half planning to change jobs within 12 months.

Demand for talent in technology and digital jobs is still outstripping supply, according recruitment firm Global Attract's annual Recruitment and Salary Guide.

Sixty per cent of workers in devOps and infrastructure, financial services, IT, software development, testing and QA and project management fields intend to look for a new role.

Global Attract experis director Dave Newick said New Zealand was a breeding ground for innovation and skilled workers had confidence in the tech industry - so were willing to change roles frequently.

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"The main reasons for job-hopping include a lack of training and a lack of flexible benefits," Newick said. "The desire for more annual leave, flexible working arrangements and an enticing annual bonus scheme are also factors behind the movement."

Newick said employers need to be smarter about staff training and retention strategies.

Findings reveal 73 per cent of those in the project management sector intend to change jobs within the next year, with 59 per cent in devOps and infrastructure and 56 per cent in the software development, testing and QA sectors.

High demand and lack of supply of skilled workers are also driving contractor growth and mobility.

"We are seeing a significant shortage of project managers and business analysts with Cloud and Digital experience," he said. "Forecast growth in this field and skill shortages will push contracting rates and salaries up, forcing employers to look offshore to fill roles," he said.

Global Attract experis director Dave Newick.
Global Attract experis director Dave Newick.

The report also found 22 per cent of those surveyed had never undergone formal training for their role. Newick said the need for staff with experience in e-commence and Bitcoin is set to increase.

"Large organisations are competing with smaller, more agile digital businesses that offer a greater range of flexibility on benefit and projects," he said.

"The key to securing the best candidates in Financial Services is to look at what workers consider important benefits - training, annual bonus and flexible working."

DevOps and infrastructure:

• 21 per cent satisfied in their job
• 27 per cent never participated in formal training
• 59 per cent intend to change jobs

Financial services:

• 34 per cent satisfied in their job
• 18 per cent never participated in formal training
• 81 per cent feel secure in their jobs

IT executive:

• 32 per cent satisfied in their job
• 54 per cent intend to change jobs
• 41 per cent face challenges balancing innovation & budget

Software development, testing and QA:

• 36 per cent satisfied in their job
• 29 per cent never participated in formal training
• 56 per cent intend to change jobs

Project management:

• 28 per cent satisfied in their job
• 14 per cent never participated in formal training
• 73 per cent intend to change jobs